PRIVATE EMPIRE EXXONMOBIL AND AMERICAN POWER PDF

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PRIVATE EMPIRE: EXXONMOBIL AND AMERICAN. POWER. By Steve Coll , Penguin Press Reviewed by William A. Mogel*. Readers of this Journal. Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power The Rise and Decline of the American 'Empire': Power and its Limits in Comparative Perspective. Private Empire Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Coll goes deep inside ExxonMobil Corp, the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States, revealing the true extent of its political and economic power. Book details Author: Steve Coll Pages: pages Publisher.


Private Empire Exxonmobil And American Power Pdf

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In this stirring travelogue, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporter journeys through the tumultuous nations of South Asia--India, Pakistan, Bangladesh. Ebook Pdf By Steve Coll Private Empire Exxonmobil And American Power contains important information and a detailed explanation about Ebook Pdf By. World Stage: NPR [PDF] Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power ( In Private. Empire Steve Coll investigates the largest and.

Executives at the company maintained close personal connections with members of the Bush administration — but Coll says the "cliched idea that Exxon-Mobil was just an instrument of the Bush administration's foreign policy — a kind of extension of the American government during the Bush years — is just wrong. Coll has written extensively about Afghanistan and Pakistan and the uses of government power.

But in Private Empire , he turns his attention to ExxonMobil, one of the largest private corporations in the United States. Exxon, which merged with Mobil in , descends from John D.

Rockefeller's Standard Oil Co. Coll says ExxonMobil executives "see themselves — ExxonMobil — as an independent sovereign with their own foreign policy," he says. During Raymond's tenure, Exxon funded campaigns to challenge the validity of emerging science about climate change — specifically the findings that a global warming trend existed. Open Preview See a Problem?

Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Private Empire by Steve Coll.

Private Empire: In Private Empire Steve Coll investigates the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States, revealing the true extent of its power. Yet despite its outsized influence, it is a black box. The action spans the globe, moving from Moscow, to impoverished African capitals, Indonesia, and elsewhere in heart-stopping scenes that feature kidnapping cases, civil wars, and high-stakes struggles at the Kremlin.

He draws here on more than four hundred interviews; field reporting from the halls of Congress to the oil-laden swamps of the Niger Delta; more than one thousand pages of previously classified U. A penetrating, newsbreaking study, Private Empire is a defining portrait of ExxonMobil and the place of Big Oil in American politics and foreign policy.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published May 1st by Penguin Press first published January 1st More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Private Empire , please sign up. Lists with This Book.

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. May 25, HBalikov rated it really liked it. I want to add this to my previous review because this book is still relevant for understanding this major global corporation. While the company appears to remain confident that future climate change policies and regulations will not materially impact its operations or financial well-being, it remains to be seen what effect the recent New York lawsuit will have on that message.

Investors, especially activist investors and other concerned stakeholders will be paying great attention as to how the lawsuit unfolds and what information is gained regarding the use of proxy costs. That, in turn, should serve as a warning to oil and gas and other carbon-intensive companies, who should exercise caution in assessing how climate change impacts are measured internally and externally, how those risks are communicated to shareholders, and whether those messages are consistent.

Most of us think we know ExxonMobil, but and I promise to keep my puns to a minimum like their major investments, much lies below the surface. I learned a lot from Coll's book because he: Avoids a lot of jargon; 2. Keeps any political agenda to a minimum; 3.

Gives us lay people an understanding of Exxon's world in a way we can understand; 4. Describes how complex it is to run a business of this size and diversity: Highlights the lurking corporatocracy in this company's dealings in the USA and foreign countries.

I wonder if he were writing it in would he: Give us more of a focus on the company's attitude s toward climate change?

Discuss more about their bedfellows in lobbying? Focus on investments such as their multi-billion dollar play in algae? Draw more links between USA's foreign policy and Exxon's interests. Plenty of documentation for the research and interviews Coll conducted make this a thought-provoking read.

View all 10 comments. May 14, Holly Morrow added it. Oh, you know I had to read this. OK, first things first: I am about as highly motivated a reader as Steve Coll is likely to find, but it just gets loooong. OK, next: I found it overall quite fair.

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It is extensively researched and gets the fundamentals of the energy business right for example: The substance is accurate and generally criticizes where criticism is warranted though praise is perhaps a bit spare and the stories that he chooses to explore in depth seem selected with a preference for showing the company in a negative light.

One thing I found off: As Coll himself states in the introduction, he wanted to write a book about American corporate power and how it is its own force — separate and apart from traditional government power. He just repeatedly cues the Darth Vader music and then moves on. So, given that that is a, maybe THE, central theme in the book, its an important flaw. Moreover, it assumes an omnipotence that is laughably far from what reality feels like in the company — beleaguered, subject to the whim of geology and fickle, irrational, and sometimes venal governments — both foreign and here at home.

What he gets very right is the culture of the company — diligent, priggish, smart as hell, data-driven, disciplined and rigorous to a fault, unsentimental. I have laughed with some ex-military guys in the company about how easy the transition must have been.

And he captures very well the transition from Lee Raymond, the extremely hard-assed former CEO, to Rex Tillerson — a transition that held some subtle but important shifts in company policy.

At any rate, I suspect this book will be a lot more ExxonMobil than people really want to curl up with. But I found it overall well-done and fair, if one cuts through the sinister and ominous smoke that wafts about in the tone of the book starting with the black cover and scary title and focuses on the substance. View 1 comment. Jan 15, Mikey B.

ExxonMobil: A 'Private Empire' On The World Stage

This is an indelible picture of the long-standing oil enterprise. Even though the style is understated, factual and sometimes sardonic we are given an up-close view, of what for all intents and purposes, is a most nefarious business. Extracting oil is their primary activity — what happens to the environment and the people in the land they occupy is all secondary. Only recently — when Rex Tillerson took the helm of ExxonMobil in This is an indelible picture of the long-standing oil enterprise.

Only recently — when Rex Tillerson took the helm of ExxonMobil in did it begin to acknowledge that global warming and climate change were occurring. Prior, they were in full denial. The estimates of the reserves of both natural gas and oil have risen over the last few years — partially because of new discoveries and new technology. However the extraction processes are still in the development stages and getting to these reserves is becoming more and more environmentally invasive — leading to more global warming.

ExxonMobil as do the other major oil companies have nicely documented procedures on how to deal with oil spills and other environmental calamities — but this is just paper — the actual resources equipment such as planes, trucks ExxonMobil devotes a significant portion of their environmental documentation on dealing with the media. The saddest and most revealing parts of the book are how ExxonMobil inhabits impoverished countries.

The author demonstrates that in the African countries the quality of living has not improved not so sure about Indonesia. While it may not be ExxonMobil role to manage the distribution of wealth in these societies — they themselves are profiting immensely from these ventures. One could argue that this is exploitation pure and simple. After all, if one goes into a country and makes a ton of money should you not give something in return?

This book is a powerful and searing depiction of a multinational. The author is somewhat dismissive of the electric car and how it would impact the oil and car manufacturing industry. This would lead to a substantial decrease in fuel consumption and thus slow down global warming.

Why is it that industrialized Europe uses less fuel consumption per capita that North America? But there is a large moral quandary to it all. View all 3 comments. Jul 14, Minyoung Lee rated it really liked it.

I worked for and been involved in Exxon's major competitor since , and therefore my perspective of Exxon and this book in general may be skewed. A lot of the focus of the book is based on this recent history of Exxon, which I was actually fortunate to have lived through and experienced, so I may have more of an appreciation of what the author is trying to portray about the company and the industry during the time. That being said, I found this book extremely entertaining and true Disclaimer: That being said, I found this book extremely entertaining and true to the sentiment of what most non-Exxon people in the industry feel about Exxon.

Admittedly, the content of the book was slightly different to what I had expected. I had expected some individual's viewpoints and preachy commentary, but was pleasantly surprised to find that the entire book pretty much comprised of detailed and very visual anecdotes.

The overall tone of the book is very objective, and the author is definitely not trying to force anything down the reader's throat, and I appreciate this aspect of the writing very, very much. The truth just simply is that Exxon is an extremely large and powerful company driven by stakeholder profits, and is very successful at what it does. It currently holds a credit rating better than that of the US. Us "smaller" oil companies and the general public as well, I suppose like to diss the company as evil and unethical, but maybe Exxon's strategy of completely disengaging itself from "morals" is exactly what makes the company so profitable in the first place.

So kudos to Exxon and the niche it had paved in the industry and the US economy. Love it or hate it, one still has to admit, that this formidable monster of a corporation does affect so much of the every contemporary person's life.

The author did a very good job of depicting a very sensitive topic in a very objective, readable tone. May 16, Mal Warwick rated it liked it Shelves: The two companies probably compete for that distinction today.

Oh, yes, it has changed. You probably also knew that ExxonMobil is the direct descendent of the Standard Oil trust assembled in the 19th Century by the quintessential robber baron, John D. Breakthrough batteries might be the pathway, or breakthrough biofuels, or cheaper, more efficient solar technology, or some combination of those technologies, or perhaps something unimagined in the present.

Not anytime soon, however. However, what both authors underplay is that the large new deposits of oil and natural gas the companies are adding to their reserves, seemingly by the day, tend to require more expensive and environmentally more damaging methods of extraction.

Private Empire - PDF eBooks Free Download

Unfortunately, there seems little likelihood of that. Name a big city: The book is structured chronologically, focusing on the period from t0 Along the way, Coll constructs detailed scenarios that reveal the issues confronting the company in a number of countries where it sources oil or gas or mightily tries to do so: In fact, he details the sometimes fractious relationship the company had even with the oil-friendly Administration of George W.

In fact, the book will probably be read by some as an apologia for ExxonMobil. From www. Sep 07, Hardy rated it liked it. As you might imagine, with oil being such a strategic commodity, large oil companies work closely with the federal government.

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In countries such as Brazil and Mexico, there is a national oil company run by politicians. In the United States, it seems like there is a national government run by private oil companies. If you already assume the worst, then nothing in this book will surprise you. Feb 10, John rated it really liked it.

I gained a greater level of insight into the multinational workings of the oil industry. We start out with the Exxon Valdez disaster and end with the Deepwater Horizon well cap blowout. The later is a BP problem and not Exxon In between; its business in failing states, terrorists, torture and benign neglect in Ache, Washington lobbing, and trying repair popular opinion.

A very interesting book. I like Steve Coll a lot. Petro chemicals are going to be with us for a long time. With or without gl I gained a greater level of insight into the multinational workings of the oil industry. With or without global warming. Jun 12, Michele Weiner rated it really liked it. Some parts of this very detailed look at the world according to ExxonMobile are riveting - The Exxon Valdez disaster opens the book and draws one into the Big Oil story immediately.

After a too-brief recounting of the reaction of Exxon to this high-profile spill, there is a too-brief "How we got here" segment which goes as far back as the breaking up of the mammoth Standard Oil into baby companies, of which ExxonMobile is one, formerly known as Esso, which is short for Standard Oil of New Jersey Some parts of this very detailed look at the world according to ExxonMobile are riveting - The Exxon Valdez disaster opens the book and draws one into the Big Oil story immediately.

After a too-brief recounting of the reaction of Exxon to this high-profile spill, there is a too-brief "How we got here" segment which goes as far back as the breaking up of the mammoth Standard Oil into baby companies, of which ExxonMobile is one, formerly known as Esso, which is short for Standard Oil of New Jersey. Exxon recruits mainly from southern and midwestern universities, and mainly engineers or scientists. The corporate atmosphere is very regimented and homogeneous, almost cult-like or Amway in its boosterism and insularity.

Exxon doesn't advertise like it used to and it doesn't really lobby like other people do. It just sends straight-as-an-arrow, arrogant engineers with Power Point presentations to educate the rubes about oil. Exxon believes, or did for years, that nobody not in the oil business understood the "global oil market," by which they appeared to mean that they might be bad, but if they were prohibited from some bad actions by US law, other companies from countries without scruples would just step in and download the oil anyway.

In other words, you need us more than we need you, suckers.

They took it through the courts till all the original parties were dead, and believe that's just business played the hard way. When some public interest groups tried to do in-depth research to see if there was still oil in the sound and how it affected wildlife, ExxonMobil followed them and hounded them with FOIA requests until some quit in disgust.

That didn't stop them from proving that the oil is still there and messing up the ecosystem. Exxon suborned scientists to find that global warming didn't exist for fifteen or twenty years until the overwhelming evidence and a change at the top Raymond retired unwillingly , enabled them to slowly alter their position.

The fact that the oil is at present almost always found in places that are violent makes Exxon's job more difficult. Underdeveloped societies in which oil is discovered become corrupt and warped, the general population usually loses ground while a ruling group overindulges in aircraft, jewelry and weapons.

Such a society for example, Equatorial Guinea becomes a target for overthrow from within and without. In Indonesia, Africa and Nigeria, Exxon is forced to work with emerging regimes of various degrees of bloodthirstiness, and to expose workers to threats of violence.

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ExxonMobil: A 'Private Empire' On The World Stage

Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. Book details Author: Steve Coll Pages: Penguin Press Language: English ISBN Description this book Private Empire Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Coll goes deep inside ExxonMobil Corp, the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States, revealing the true extent of its political and economic power. Full descriptionPrivate Empire: Full description https: If you want to download this book, click link in the last page 5.

Download Free Private Empire: You just clipped your first slide! Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.In the case of the invasion of Iraq, it sounds as though EM generally opposed the war and would have been happy with the status quo.

After a too-brief recounting of the reaction of Exxon to this high-profile spill, there is a too-brief "How we got here" segment which goes as far back as the breaking up of the mammoth Standard Oil into baby companies, of which ExxonMobile is one, formerly known as Esso, which is short for Standard Oil of New Jersey Some parts of this very detailed look at the world according to ExxonMobile are riveting - The Exxon Valdez disaster opens the book and draws one into the Big Oil story immediately.

So, given that that is a, maybe THE, central theme in the book, its an important flaw. In terms of security measures, it was somewhat surprising to me that companies like EM rely almost exclusively on the local military or police for security, rather than hiring Blackwater-style western security companies.

But there is a large moral quandary to it all. The overall tone of the book is very objective, and the author is definitely not trying to force anything down the reader's throat, and I appreciate this aspect of the writing very, very much. His second was awarded in , for his book, Ghost Wars, which also won the Council on Foreign Relations' Arthur Ross award; the Overseas Press Club award and the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book published on international affairs during Jun 12, Michele Weiner rated it really liked it.

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