CONTINUOUS DELIVERY EBOOK

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Compre Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Confira também os eBooks mais vendidos, lançamentos e livros digitais exclusivos. “Whether or not your software development team already understands that continuous integration is every bit as necessary as source code control, this is. Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Adobe Reader) by Jez Humble, David Farley. Getting software released to users is often a painful, risky, and time-consuming process.


Continuous Delivery Ebook

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Our new continuous delivery ebook is here and ready to download. Continuous delivery has had our attention for a while, both as a set of. Lots of people have been downloading our new ebook, Continuous Delivery: What It Is and How to Get Started. Today we're announcing its. In the late 90's I paid a visit to Kent Beck, then working in Switzerland for an insurance company. He showed me around his project and one of the interesting .

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Radical Candor: Kim Scott. The Clean Coder. The Power of Habit. Charles Duhigg. Implementing Domain-Driven Design. Vaughn Vernon. Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C. Micah Martin. Iron Gold. The Name of the Wind. Patrick Rothfuss. Yuval Noah Harari. Lean Analytics. Alistair Croll. The Wise Man's Fear. Karl Matthias. Adam Grant. Service Design Patterns. Robert Daigneau.

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Platform Revolution: Geoffrey G. Hacking Growth. Sean Ellis. Andy Weir. Business Adventures. John Brooks. Guide to Eliyahu M. Robert Cialdini. Anders Ericsson. George R. How to Be Everything. Emilie Wapnick. Don't Make Me Think, Revisited. Steve Krug.

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Item s unavailable for download. Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. It's nice to have all good concepts under one cover, but reading a pages long book that will tell you the history of GIT and SVN is pointless This book is considered a cornerstone of the DevOps movement.

It's nice to have all good concepts under one cover, but reading a pages long book that will tell you the history of GIT and SVN is pointless in my opinion. Most of the ideas presented in the book could be wrapped in one long yet succinct blog post. View 1 comment.

Mar 23, Eduards Sizovs rated it it was amazing. Whether you are a developer, operations or manager, you will find essential knowledge to improve your work an expand your comfortable zone.

I personally found some ever-missing pieces of the puzzle that baffled me on past projects and now I can easily give competent answers to what went wrong and how we could have improved. The vast experience of the authors, seen as advices and examples throughout the book, is valuable lesson both for working on existing project or realizing a start-up idea!

One of the must-read books! Feb 19, Serge Boucher rated it it was amazing. Apr 29, Chris Wood rated it it was amazing Shelves: Technologists operate in a fast-moving environment. Languages rise and fall. Application strategies constantly shift across new hardware. Presentation layers move between thick and thin client across desktop, laptop, tablet, and phone architectures.

For that reason, technology writers produce materials that have a relatively short shelf life. Every now and then, books are published which make a lasting contribution to the field of computer science and software delivery i. Knuth's Art of Comput Technologists operate in a fast-moving environment.

Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Adobe Reader)

Knuth's Art of Computer Programming or Brooks' Mythical Man Month and find interested readers regularly pulling them off their shelves. Continuous Delivery by Farley and Humble is one such book. Combining an uncanny vision for emerging technology trends, awareness of available delivery tools, massive experience in the realm of software delivery, and well articulated delivery strategies, the authors offer a relatively vendor-agnostic discussion of the delivery pipeline that ensures code quality, quick time-to-market, and painless release processes.

This book is highly relevant for anyone involved in the field of technology: Oct 25, Mark Seemann rated it did not like it Shelves: Some years ago, I had the fortune to attend Jes Humble's workshop on continuous delivery.

It was a good workshop, well delivered, and I learned a lot. I was, therefore, surprised that it turned out to be such a struggle to read this book. It's not that I disagree with the contents, but it's so boring!

DevOps Testing: The Primary Key to DevOps and Continuous Delivery

Each page is mostly a wall of text, with no diagrams, sidebars, illustrations, or even bulleted lists. Even when there's an occasional diagram, it seems strangely unhelpful.

While it could be that th Some years ago, I had the fortune to attend Jes Humble's workshop on continuous delivery. While it could be that the material simply doesn't lend itself easily to illustrations, I don't think that's the case.

As an example, on page , the authors discuss the diamond dependency problem, but they use only text. If that isn't an opportunity for an illustration, I don't know what is. This particular problem is named after a shape the diamond shape , so it'd be a simple matter to add an illustration. The opportunity is missed, here, and many other places.

It's not that I'm afraid of books without diagrams; I read lots of fiction. In a textbook that attempts to teach, on the other hand, I think the reader needs all the help s he can get to get through dry material. Such help is absent here. Show, don't tell.

View all 3 comments. Jun 23, Harlen rated it liked it. The book successfully teaches the reader about continuous delivery, the process and its benefits. Where this book stumbles is with the amount of repetition and lack of real-world examples. Overall it's a good reference for the individual aspects that create a continuous delivery system; however, I wouldn't recommend reading it from cover to cover.

Sep 30, Sergey Shishkin rated it really liked it. A very good overview of the topic. Although given it's pages thick, the book could be more specific about dealing with credentials in production environments and data migrations. The companion website is another missed oportunity. Still 4 stars for the lack of a better alternative. Nov 30, Jan Van Ryswyck rated it did not like it Shelves: There's much wisdom in this book, but it's buried in boring writing.

Dec 30, Sergio Inclan rated it it was amazing. Excellent book, clean and to the point. Oct 31, Dun Yang rated it really liked it. This was a hard read for me. Initially, the concepts made sense but I found it hard to apply them without project experience.

I stopped at around chapter 9 and after having around 6 months of experience on a project that uses deployment pipelines and tools e.

This time, I have a better appreciation of the concepts that are discussed in the book since I am able to compare them to what we are doing in the project.

At this point, I have also read "The Phoenix Project", which might also have helped with understanding the discussion on management and change control. That said, it won't hurt to skim some of the earlier chapters to get a rough idea of some of the principles to supplement the introductory articles on the net. Jul 13, Vlad Romanenko rated it it was amazing.

Interesting to see the book hasn't lost any relevance despite being written in This is definitely not an easy ready but rather a fundamental work on the subject. It's kind of like bible on continuous delivery that I'm sure I'll be referring back to as certain aspects of it become important in my work.

I like how the book repeats over and over its core idea of having automated pipeline that makes feedback to developers faster and shorten the delivery cycle of working software.

It covers wid Interesting to see the book hasn't lost any relevance despite being written in It covers wide range of topics to support this idea. Few things really stick in my mind: But it brings all practices together in structured and coherent way. May 07, Warren Mcpherson rated it liked it Shelves: A set of ideas about how to manage large scale software development.

This makes a convincing case that a systematic approach can efficiently deliver high-quality software. In its time this was absolutely a great book, I'm not sure people are asking the same questions today.

The authors are very knowledgeable and have remarkable foresight in particular about the significance of cloud systems. At the same time, cloud deployments make some parts of the book feel a bit outdated. The layout of the boo A set of ideas about how to manage large scale software development.

The layout of the book helps it make a convincing case that continuous delivery is an important and completely viable goal. It has advice applicable to a very broad range of situations related to implementing continuous delivery.

The book is not particularly outdated. It could serve as a good introduction to the subject. I just suspect it will no longer move a large number of people forward the way it would have a few years ago. It's a great book to take a perfect grasp of software release strategies. I would recommend this book for both experienced software engineers or the engineers who just started. If you are in big software teams, you most probably do most of the guidelines in the book, but still, the book provides a good perspective of the issues and possibly a complete checklist when you face the situation!

I noticed lots of people complaining about the repetitiveness of the book. I do agree with part of it. Howe It's a great book to take a perfect grasp of software release strategies. However, this is a case for a book on this subject as the author needs to set up a context in order to explain a point.

So be cool with it and enjoy the reading! May 21, Holger Matthies rated it it was amazing Shelves: Eye opening. Everybody in IT should read this book, be he programmer, tester or operations specialist. Some parts might not surprise you all that much, but are great to revisit - even old hands might learn a thing or two from the refreshing mix of theory and practice, and the very relevant real life examples. Some parts were completely new to me and touched areas I had previously little knowledge of.

I feel thoroughly updated. It is a long read, with some chapters written better than others, but r Eye opening.

It is a long read, with some chapters written better than others, but reading everything in the order it was written was well worth it. May 27, Fernando rated it really liked it. This is THE classic for continuous delivery. Worth reading.

Continuous Delivery

But it was written 10 years ago and sometimes that's obvious. Almost no mention to the cloud. A bit more to the DVCS. Focus on mainline development which I think it has value today but it needs a different explanation from 10 years ago. But the principles are there.

So read it. Jul 05, Ilyes Hachani rated it it was amazing Shelves: Half way through. The content is good but as the Authors stated there is a lot of repetition trade off to make chpaters standalone.

The book lacks real world examples but I found it easy to get started once you know what you are looking for.Learn what every DevOps team needs to know to increase velocity and produce more stable code. Open source workflow engine for provisioning and managing cloud native infrastructure. Instead, we'd love it if you'd read it and then continue learning.

Customers are usually interested in throughput or capacity. As an example, on page , the authors discuss the diamond dependency problem, but they use only text. Customer stories.

GENIE from Simi Valley
I do like curiously. Also read my other articles. One of my extra-curricular activities is valencian pilota.
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