COMIC BOOK HISTORY OF COMICS

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Comic Book History of Comics [Fred Van Lente, Ryan Dunlavey] on bestthing.info . *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. For the first time ever, the inspiring. The medium is the message! Comics come in many forms, from all around the world. What better way to discover them than through a comic book?. For the first time ever, the inspiring, infuriating, and utterly insane story of comics, graphic novels, and manga is presented in four-color glory! The award-winning.


Comic Book History Of Comics

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Comic Book History of Comics book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. For the first time ever, the inspiring, infuriating. Compre o livro Comic Book History of Comics: Birth of a Medium na bestthing.info .br: confira as ofertas para livros em inglês e importados. Compre Comic Book History of Comics (English Edition) de Fred Van Lente, Ryan Dunlavey na bestthing.info Confira também os eBooks mais vendidos.

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Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Ryan Dunlavey. For the first time ever, the inspiring, infuriating, and utterly insane story of comics, graphic novels, and manga is presented in comic book form!

Crumb, Harvey Kurtzman, Alan Moore, Stan Lee, Will Eisner, Fredric Wertham, For the first time ever, the inspiring, infuriating, and utterly insane story of comics, graphic novels, and manga is presented in comic book form!

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More Details Comic Book History of Comics. Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Comic Book History of Comics , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Comic Book History of Comics.

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jan 25, Farhana rated it really liked it Shelves: Jun 21, Kate rated it it was amazing Shelves: I was willing to give this book a try because upon skimming, I saw that it gave Dr.

Wertham a fair analysis: Van Lente and Dunlavey present not only all the medical and especially social work he did that formed the background for his incendiary attitude toward '50s comics, they also both fairly, and hilariously--I about choked with laughter at some panels in the p.

This a very dense work, but it has to be: Stan Lee's highly collaborative work with Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, and how the lack of credit for Kirby and Ditko's input in the universe led to tensions and breaking within Marvel; Walt Disney's union-busting efforts in , when he tried to get the organizers arrested by the FBI by denouncing them as communists; or Bob Kane refusing credit to the co-creator of Batman, Bill Finger, and to Jerry Robinson, who co-created the Joker and Robin with Finger.

This makes for a fascinating history. The last few chapters are harder to 'get' than the preceding, but I don't think this is an issue with Van Lente and Dunlavey's work so much as it's a reflection that the increasing corporatizing of the comic industry led to a dizzying amount of mergers, download-outs, and other Wall Street mathematics--not to mention all the copyright issues, transfers, and other entanglements--and that's bloody hard to keep straight.

It's really to their credit that the chapters on these situations "No More Wednesdays" and " AD," and also "The Grabbers," on the creators' rights legal battles in the '80s are as clear as they are. It also has the distinction of being another 'choking on laughter' page. The sheer amount of research, depth and breadth, dedication, and love for the medium in this work makes it worth all 5 stars.

I only picked this up because my enjoyment of the recent Marvel universe movies made me a little interested in the background, and I was blown away by all that Van Lente and Dunlavey managed to encompass. Highly, highly recommended for comic book fans, of any level. View 1 comment. Dec 18, Dov Zeller rated it liked it Shelves: This is a hard one to rate.

It is a very dense, fairly interesting, unflaggingly homosocial history of comics, though it is not just one history, but overlapping, shifting histories, re-manifesting histories. By the end of the book it is clear that there are many ways to approach comic history and some versions could go back as far as several hundred years and some to the early nineteen hundreds I would argue for cave paintings as another beginning.

How and when does an art form begin? Where d This is a hard one to rate. Where do we locate the earliest seedlings? Who knows. Creation myths are, after all, myths. But there are less mythical seminal moments that stand out. There are people who are clearly of utmost influence and importance. And Lente tries to clarify and describe these moments and immortalize the people who happen to be, every single one of them, men. So, what do I think of this book?

It's tries to be silly at times when it doesn't need to be and probably shouldn't be. It confuses comic and comic as if a book about sequential art has to be a comedy. Sometimes I worry Lente is stuck in Action Philosophers mode like an old fashioned record player, and he can't get out of that mode of hyper-active caricature.

There are a lot of gags in here and it's just too packed with intensity and theatricality.

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There is a forced quality to the humor. Graphics work in a way that I find distracts from the text rather than offering textual collaboration. I think I would have loved a very similar but very different book. One addressing similar content, but with a different demeanor, a calmer, more confident approach, and one that isn't to the Bechdel test what a radish is to cheesecake.

Dec 13, Stewart Tame rated it really liked it. Very nicely done! Van Lente and Dunlavey do an admirable job of condensing comics history into a single volume without leaving anything major out.

This is comics history from an American point of view. Europe, the UK, and Japan are touched on only with regards to the ways in which their comics have been received in the USA, plus any pertaining cultural background--for the UK, for instance, Mick Anglo's Marvelman is mentioned partly for the Captain Marvel influence and partly because of its impac Very nicely done!

Europe, the UK, and Japan are touched on only with regards to the ways in which their comics have been received in the USA, plus any pertaining cultural background--for the UK, for instance, Mick Anglo's Marvelman is mentioned partly for the Captain Marvel influence and partly because of its impact on Alan Moore's career; AD and Warrior get mentioned for similar reasons.

Not a complaint so much as an observation. Comics history is full of fascinating sidebars that aren't really germane to the big picture.

That said, there's an impressive level of detail in this book, and I'd even go so far as to call it the single best general overview of the subject I've ever read. Van Lente and Dunlavey are particularly good at showing broader cultural context. One reason the Golden Age of comics took off in New York City in particular was because there was a large pool of out of work talent due to Fleischer Animation Studios packing up and moving to Florida.

I had not known that before, not being a student of animation history. The book is chock full of such interesting details. Highly recommended! Aug 14, Raina rated it liked it Shelves: Yeah, yeah, yeah. A bit scattered. The entire history of an art form is difficult to contain in a linear narrative. I appreciated reading this for myself, as an overview of points in comics history I haven't studied before. I feel like I understand the ownership rights drama a little bit better now that I've read this.

And have more fodder for my ongoing opinion-forming re: BEC Yeah, yeah, yeah. The pages are packed with illustrations and text, and the reader gets no breaks. So, I feel like, as a comic book, this could be better crafted. But the content is important and worth communicating. I'd almost say this would be a good text book for high school or so, but there's enough R rated content, maybe not so much.

Obviously biased and from a particular point of view, but fairly transparent in that point of view. The coverage of Disney is particularly intriguing. It's a good start. Feb 20, Cardyn Brooks rated it it was amazing. Often wry, snide, ironic and sarcastic, The Comic Book History of Comics is an engaging introduction to the appeal and evolution of illustrated storytelling.

Oct 20, David Schaafsma rated it liked it Shelves: This is impressive, I guess, in the very achievement of a comic book history of comics, as Scott McCloud helps us see comic theory through comic form I can't say I really liked it, visually, though I see what they are doing, to pay homage to the various styles across the decades But I still didn't love it I have started this a couple times and put it down, saw all the rave reviews for it and thought I should get through it, give it a chance I think it is a good basic intro to the whole history, so it's impressive in that respect, and never intends to be "objective," as in a typical history book, which I also appreciate.

Jul 24, Rick rated it it was amazing Shelves: Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey, creators of the unexpected and exceptional Action Philosophers , return to the nonfiction comics realm with this hilarious and insightful history of their chosen medium. Much like in Philosophers , the duo effectively uses exaggeration and humor.

Van Lente employees asides and one-liners. Dunlavey relies on the best techniques from cartoonist forebearers. Perhaps nothing benefits more from this style than the events involving EC.

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They manage to display M. Gaines Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey, creators of the unexpected and exceptional Action Philosophers , return to the nonfiction comics realm with this hilarious and insightful history of their chosen medium. Gaines as a visionary, victim, and buffoon, often all at the same time. Though not as thorough as other similar prose histories, The Comic Book History of Comics covers the highlights in an energetic and exciting fashion of the convoluted, chaotic, and often tortured history in a unique and informative manner.

Oct 28, Ben Loory rated it it was amazing. May 02, Mario rated it it was amazing. This review originally appeared on my blog Shared Universe Reviews.

In approximately pages, Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey somehow manage to write and draw the history of comic books. This was a huge undertaking and anybody even slightly familiar with the history contained in this comic will know that.

The history of comics This review originally appeared on my blog Shared Universe Reviews. The history of comics is long and rich enough that there have been books published that focused narrowly on even just one of the many subjects Van Lente and Dunlavey present in The Comic Book History of Comics. Still, the creative team did have to concentrate their efforts a bit and they do put the focus mostly on the development of American comics.

Nevertheless, they take the time to highlight the importance and the contributions of outside markets and sometimes even concentrate on the importance of specific creators such as Osamu Tezuka. Two things really stuck out to me while reading.

Comic Book History Of Comics USA 1898-1972

The first is that it was a regular practice for most publishers since the early days of comics to print and sell as many issues and titles of whatever appeared to be popular at the present time.

Because of this you got large booms in particular genres for a relatively short period of time only to see them vanish just as quickly. The rise and fall of romance comics is but one example of this. The second thing that stuck out was that creators regularly mistreated one another, sometimes in public and often in public locals, most notably courts of law.

It saddens me as someone who regularly reads and enjoys comics and believes the creator rights that there has been, and unfortunately continues to be, numerous battles often legal in nature between creators. I'm aware that not all of them fought so much but it's upsetting to know that Stan Lee has his little cameo in all the Marvel studio movies and that his name is widely known. His name is often dropped in episodes of The Big Bang Theory and he's appeared on the show at least once.

It can be far too easy to enjoy reading comics in a vacuum within considering what goes on behind the scenes but I appreciate being given a reminder of the hardships some of the comic creators faced. Both of those frustrations seem to primarily affect the American comics industry. Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey are unapologetic in their approach to the history of the medium they clearly love. Van Lenteand Dunlavey are clear in their explanation as to why the animation war played an important role in the development of comics and creator rights legal battles.

The Comic Book History of Comics makes me feel bad for having ignored or neglected to read some important comics work. Pretty shameful, I know.

Comic Book History of Comics

The ending is spot on. Despite the fact that the comics industry has faced numerous issues and setbacks in its history, the book ends on a positive note. One of the strengths of this important work is that the creative team accepts the good along with the bad and presents all of these to the reader. Compra verificada.

Van Lente chooses just the right moments to help weave the narrative history. Best part: The pages devoted to the women who helped shape the industry. This is a great book about the history of comics that had me laughing out loud on numerous occasions. It is surprisingly self-aware and easy-to-read. It is full of historical fact and appears rather dense upon first glance, but the narrative style and humor make it hard to put down. The history begins around and is mostly heavily focused upon what is traditionally considered the Golden and Silver Ages of American comics approximately s until early s.

Understandably, its hard to write a history focused on the near present. However, I wish there was additional material covering the 80s and 90s. Hopefully a future edition. To be clear, this is not a book about superhero comics.

Of course, its hard to talk about American comics without discussing superheroes, but the book just a great job of covering all of the other important genres including EC horror and the underground movement of the 70s. My only real complaint, and its a minor one, is that the book has no pretenses to objectivity when it comes to some of the creator disputes involving Siegel and Shuster, McFarlane, etc.

The authors even refer to Kirby as "our hero. A thick but approachable book, this book tells the history of comics, starting from political cartoons and "funnies," through their evolution into collections of funnies, and finally comic books.

With a deft hand, the illustrations and even lettering evoke the material of each period, while maintaining a coherent metastyle across the production. Of particular note is the even hand with which the near constant efforts of censorship against comics have been portrayed. As much as this is an excellent introduction for anyone to comics, it is a must-read for any fan of the medium who wants to speak intelligently when defending it.

Just fantastic.It picks up pretty quickly after that, covering such major events as the Seduction of the Innocence and the Senate subcommittee hearings, the creation of Marvel Comics, the underground comix scene, the battle over creators' rights between artists like Jack Kirby and Jerry Siegel, the "British Invasion" in the mid-eighties and the speculation boom and bust in the eighties and nineties, and the development of Franco-Belgian and Japanese comics.

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