KRIS VALLOTTON PDF

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Kris Vallotton's goal is to demolish the "slave mind-set" and thrust true believers forward into authentic faith, power, and impact. The Supernatural Ways of Royalty will change your life! Dr. Myles Munroe CEO, Bahamas Faith Ministry Author of Rediscovering the Kingdom Kris. KRIS VALLOTTON MINISTRIES bestthing.info 1. Prophecy and Prophets. There is a difference between the office of a Prophet and the gift of prophecy. My wife and I have been friends with Kris and Kathy. Vallotton and their children for over 32 years. They are two of the most important people in our lives.


Kris Vallotton Pdf

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Mining from years on the frontlines of prophetic ministry and overseeing the Bethel School of. Supernatural Ministry, bestselling author Kris Vallotton takes you. Read The Supernatural Ways of Royalty PDF Discovering Your Rights and Privileges of Being a Son or Daughter of God Ebook by Kris. —Kris Vallotton. Leader, Bethel Church, Redding, California. Co-Founder of Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry. Author of eight books including, The.

This book is protected by the copyright laws of the United States of America. This book may not be copied or reprinted for commercial gain or profit.

The use of short quotations or occasional page copying for personal or group study is permitted and encouraged. Permission will be granted upon request. Used by permission. Please note that Destiny Image's publishing style capitalizes certain pronouns in Scripture that refer to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and may differ from some publishers' styles. Take note that the name satan and related names are not capitalized.

We choose not to acknowledge him, even to the point of violating grammatical rules. Most revivals don't get past this one point, and therefore cannot sustain a move of God until it becomes a lifestyle. It's difficult to build something substantial on a negative.

The other half of the equation is how holy He is on our behalf. When this is realized, our identity changes and our faith embraces the purpose of our salvation. At some point we must go beyond being simply "sinners saved by grace.

What one generation could accomplish from this one revelation is far beyond comprehension. The Supernatural Ways of Royalty is an answer to such a heart crya Kris Vallotton takes us on a fearfully exciting journey through his testimony and the fresh revelations from Scripture that made it possible.

Few have traveled this way before. Some reject it for fear of becoming proud and have chosen perpetual immaturity as a result. Much of what we desire in life is found in the tension of conflicting realities. Therefore, to the weak in faith, confidence appears to be arrogance. Faith must rise beyond the recognized norm into a lifestyle that accurately represents the victorious Son of God. We must trust God's ability to keep us more than we trust the devil's ability to deceive.

Kris and I have walked together in covenant for nearly 28 years. I have watched this revelation transform a man and have seen God's healing grace poured out on a broken life. Today Kris serves the Body of Christ as an unusually gifted man, a living testimony of God's strength being "perfected in weakness. This book equips us for eternity, now. MomThanks for loving me through hard times and always believing in me.

Bill DerryberryYour life is an inspiration to me. Your love has brought me wholeness. NancyYou have helped to make my dreams come true. Vanessa and AllisonThank you for the hundreds of hours that you poured into this work. This book would have never happened without your talent and support. Bethel teamWow! You are amazing! It is a privilege to serve with you all. Bill and BeniEveryone needs friends like you who will extend grace to them in hard times and see goodness in them in the dark years.

I am in debt to you for the rest of my life. The two of you have altered the course of my family's history. Bill, thank you for writing this first book with me. EarlAlthough you have gone home, your life lives on through me.

Thank you for adopting me. I am forever grateful for the inheritance. KathyYou are the woman of my dreams! It is the condition of slaves who have yet to discover their freedom on the other side of the river of baptism and find themselves still captured by the dark prince of torture and torment. He is the one who assigns them to a life of poverty, pain, and depression through a diabolical play of illusion.

He hopes to conceal their true identity forever. This evil prince feeds his captives the poisonous rations of religion, convincing them they will fill their soul's hunger for righteousness. These slaves, blindfolded by their sin, think that they are laboring for their own freedom and work to pave their way out of prison with bricks built from the miry clay of selfrighteousness.

Yet, unknowingly, brick by brick, they are erecting their own chambers of death. Worse yet, they birth children into the same darkness, ultimately creating legacies of bondage with mind-sets of hopelessness. But on a hill far away a Lamb-turned-Lion descended into this death camp through the portal of Golgotha. Crashing through the gates of hell, He met the dark prince in the mother of all battles.

With three spikes and a thorny crown, the Captain of the Host conquered the devil, eternally disarming his destructive weapons of sin, death, hell, and the grave. Sin could not tempt Him, death couldn't defeat Him, hell couldn't keep Him, and the grave could not hold Him. With watching witnesses and waiting warriors, He ascended through earth's surface. The planet quaked to release They weren't just waiting for rescued souls to be redeemed, but for the crowning of the sons who were to be revealed.

For with His blood the Holy One of Radiance downloadd rotten, ragged sinners and recreated us into His righteous, reigning Saints. We are not just soldiers of the cross; we are heirs to the throne. The divine nature permeates our souls, transforms our minds, transplants our hearts, and transfigures our spirits.

We were made to be vessels of His glory and vehicles of His light. Perhaps we are better exemplified as the beautiful daughter who will ascend the throne through marriage, for she is betrothed to the Prince of Peace. The Bridal Chamber is being built, the feast is being prepared, and the Bride is making herself ready. We have captivated the heart of our Lover. Burning with desire, He has mounted His white horse, assembled a majestic entourage, and is making His way toward the planet!

Meanwhile back on earth, God's people are rising and beginning to shine in this present darkness. His Royal Army is spreading the King's glory all over the earth as we take dominion of this planet back from the defeated one.

Equipped with the light of the Father, His sons are finding buried treasure in the hearts of men that was once covered by rocks of offense, thorns of treachery, and relics of religion.

Armed with the power of the Holy Spirit and commissioned to re-present the King's Son, we are healing the sick, raising the dead, and displacing devils. Paupers are becoming princes as a result, and the kingdom of this world is becoming the Kingdom of our God! T all started on a bright summer day in the first year of the new millennium when Nancy, my personal assistant, entered my office looking rather troubled.

After making small talk I decided to risk asking her what was bothering her. Nancy has a reputation for telling the truth. Her gaze penetrating my soul she said, "Sometimes you say things that hurt people's feelings. You're important to the people around you and you seem completely unaware of how much people value what you think of them. You are devastating people with your words.

I thought I was being funny, but apparently I had actually made her my latest victim. I apologized to her, but honestly I really didn't think much of it.

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After all, I thought, Nancy is very sensitive and I have been used to being "misunderstood" most of my life. I went on with my day and pretty much forgot about our conversation.

That night I went to bed, fell asleep, and had a dream. In the dream a voice kept repeating this Scripture, "Under three things the earth quakes, and under four, it cannot bear up: At three in the morning I woke up, feeling groggy but I sat up against my headboard and tried to gather my thoughts.

Then I heard the Lord, who also seemed grieved, ask me, "Do you know why the earth cannot hold up under a pauper when he becomes a king? As he grows up he learns through life that he has no value and his opinions don't really matter. Therefore, when he becomes a king, he is important to the world around him but he still feels insignificant in the kingdom that lies within him. Subsequently, he doesn't watch his words or the way he carries himself.

He ultimately destroys the very people he is called to lead. You, my son, are a pauper who has become a king.

He took me to various Scriptures and showed me how important it is for His leaders to carry themselves as princes and princesses because we are sons and daughters of the King. The first example He showed me was Moses.

He asked me, "Do you know why Moses had to be raised in Pharaoh's house? Moses had to be raised in Pharaoh's house so that he would learn how to be a prince and not have a slave's mentality. A leader who is in slavery internally cannot free those who are in slavery externally. The first 40 years of Moses' life were just as important as the 40 years he spent in the wilderness. I began to imagine what it must have been like for him to be raised as a son of the king.

He would have always known he was significant. He would have been used to people paying attention to what he said and did.

He would have been accustomed to being accepted and loved. I am sure. Because Moses knew he was significant, he had confidence. I saw that without that confidence he would probably have never felt empowered to do anything to help his Hebrew brothers. In fact, if he'd been raised as a slave, it might never have occurred to him to do anything about the injustice he perceived.

As a prince and a Hebrew, the contrast between his situation and theirs created a conflict in his soul that he had to do something about. It was unjust that he was well-treated and they weren't. They were significant too. Unfortunately, when he first tried to step in to help them, their slave mentality kept them from understanding where he was coming from.

He thought they deserved to be treated like he was, but they thought he was just trying to be important when he really wasn't: The more I thought about the kind of person Moses must have been, the more I saw what kind of people we can be when we have been taught that we are significant and are not insecure about who we are.

I also saw that I was not like Moses. As I will describe in the next chapter, I was not raised with the idea that I was significant. This caused me to develop a whole set of behaviors that someone like Moses would probably have never displayed. Even after I got saved, many of these behaviors stayed around. I saw that Nancy's confrontation was about more than her simply being sensitive and me being misunderstood, which was the way I wanted to interpret it. It was about me doing things that I've always done, but which are no longer consistent with who God says that I am.

Most importantly, I saw that if I continued to do those things, I would, as the Lord had said, ultimately destroy the people I was trying to lead. I knew this confrontation was probably one of many to come on the road out of pauperhood and into my identity as a prince. I also knew that if I didn't begin to travel that road, it would not only cost me tremendously, but also those around me.

This book shares the experiences and revelations that the Lord has used to teach me how to leave pauperhood behind and to think, act, and walk in the authority and power of my kingly and priestly call. Because this training began while I was in a position of leadership in my home church, the Lord has made it clear that what I was learning was not just to transform me, but to equip me to help promote a culture of royalty around me.

This has resulted in my having the privilege of overseeing a school of ministry where the primary goal is to teach believers how to walk as princes and princesses.

Before we started the school the Lord told me, "I want you to teach the students how to behave in the presence of royalty. They are called to royalty, to influence, and to rule and reign. As forerunners, I'm going to make you a people of influence. I pray that as you come along with me on this journey you will discover your own identity as a prince or princess and begin to experience all the benefits of living in the King's palace! N the months following my encounter with Nancy, I found out that the roots of the pauper mentality could be traced all the way back to my conception.

The circumstances of my birth and my upbringing caused me to believe lies about myself that kept me from the reality of my identity in Christ. My mother was the head high school cheerleader and my father was the star football player when they fell in love with each other.

It was a storybook love affair until my mother became pregnant with me out of wedlock. It was the s, a time when society attached a lot more shame to immorality than it does today. When my grandfather my mom's father found out that she was pregnant, he disowned both my mom and dad even though they had run away and married before I was born. A year later, my father surprised my grandfather by coming to the back door of his house. Before my grandfather had a chance to send him away, my dad dropped to knees and begged for forgiveness.

My grandfather Two years later, just a year after my sister was born, my father was fishing when a huge storm suddenly came up and capsized the boat. My father rescued my uncle, taking him to shore, and then went back to retrieve the boat. He never returned. My father drowned on that stormy night in That same night a search-and-rescue team was organized to find my dad.

At around midnight, my grandfather pulled him up off of the bottom of Anderson Dam. My life and the life of my family were changed forever. My father's death created a deep sense of loss and fear of abandonment in my soul.

Of course, three-year-olds don't understand what the meaning of death is. All I knew was that he was gone and I feared that my mother would be next. For many years after that, I would get up several times a night and wander into my mother's bedroom, checking to see if she was still there. She told me years later that she would often wake up and find me standing by her bed just staring at her.

Our first stepfather came into our lives when I was five years old. He made it clear to my sister and me that he married my mother and we were just the baggage that came along with the prize. To make matters worse, he was a violent alcoholic. Brutality became a way of life for us. The house rules for survival were to "Shut up and stay out of the way. Once, while he was drunk, he held me up by one hand, pulled my pants down, and began to beat me with his belt buckle.

Blood started running down both my legs. My mother, screaming and crying, finally managed to pull me free of him.

Beyond being physically abusive, my stepfather seemed to have an agenda to rid us of all our memories of my real father.

He was very jealous of my mother's love and would torment us when she showed us any affection. He destroyed all of our father's belongings and prohibited us from seeing any of our father's relatives. Looking back, I can see that the devil was using him to destroy our identities.

My mother finally divorced him when I was 13 years old. When I was 15, my mother remarried again. Miserably, the house rules remained the same. Violence continued and survival depended on all of us children becoming invisible and remaining inconspicuous. Unfortunately, I know that what I experienced growing up is all too common.

The circumstances may differ, but those of us who experienced abandonment and abuse in our youth, even if it was simply being born in an "untimely manner" as I was, internalize a message that we are shameful, unwanted, and insignificant. The result of these lies is that we develop patterns of behavior that are designed to protect us in a hostile world.

Because we've experienced attacks at the most fundamental levels of our identity, we think we have to do whatever it takes to kill the pain and simply survive. One of my survival tactics was to develop a sarcastic sense of humor. My humor revolved around cutting people down and making them feel stupid and insignificant. Of course, I usually didn't realize I was making them feel bad, but subconsciously, I thought that destroying other people's self-esteem helped me feel better about myself. I would joke with people about their shortcomings, thinking I was just being funny, yet every laugh cost someone a piece of their heart.

Even though I found Christ at age 18, it was many years before I dealt with my low self-esteem.

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As a result, my behavior continued and I still didn't have a clue how badly I was devastating people with my humor. I should have understood it, because I was the main victim of my own humor. I often made my faults the brunt of my own jokes. I had been used. The culture of pain imprisoned my soul within me, but the Lord was determined to help me make a jail break.

The greater revelation, to me, was that people valued what I had to say. I had always believed what my stepfathers had drilled into me: People didn't really care what I thought or said. The realization that I had value began the process of uprooting the lies I believed about myself and helped me find out who I actually was. God had called me a prince, and I realized that the meeting with Nancy and the interaction I had with the Lord would just be the first of many steps that God would use to lead me out of my prison and into His palace.

I had another encounter about a year later that became the next step in my journey out of pauperhood. It began on a cold, winter Sunday evening in December. I arrived at the church late, and as I opened the front door of the building, the wind nearly blew the door off its hinges. The prayer meeting was already well underway when I entered the room. About a hundred people were passionately praying so I tried to slip in quietly so as not to disturb the meeting.

As I cleared the door, Bill, our senior leader, greeted me. He had the strangest grin on his face. He handed me something that was folded in half. I was confused by his expression as I stared at the piece of paper.

I finally realized that it was a check, but my disbelieving eyes struggled to communicate the amount with my brain. As it dawned on me, I began yelling, "Someone just gave me three thousand dollars! I almost passed out. I started jumping up and down yelling, "Thirty thousand dollars! I looked at the signature and realized that I didn't even know the person who had given me the money.

This mystery definitely thickened the plot and added to the excitement. Many days passed before I finally discovered the benevolent man's identity. He was new to our fellowship and had attended a class that I had taught earlier in the year.

One night while he was praying, he felt the Lord tell him to give me a portion of his inheritance. I wrote him a card expressing my gratitude but the strangest thing happened next. I completely avoided him for several months after he gave me that unbelievable gift. At first, what I was doing wasn't so obvious, yet as time went on it became more apparent. I would see him in a certain room in the church and I would turn around and walk the other direction.

On one occasion, I ran to the men's restroom, wondering if I was going to make it there on time, and just as I entered the bathroom I noticed he was there. His back was turned toward me and he hadn't seen me, so I ran out. I had to run all the way to the other side of the building to find another restroom. As I was racing around the building the thought struck me, "Something is wrong with me!

When I got into bed that night I couldn't sleep. It was cold and dark and the wind was howling. It seemed like I lay there forever. I kept looking at the clock, waiting for the day to dawn, tossing and turning and pondering why I was behaving so peculiarly. I couldn't get my poor behavior out of my head. My mind turned to other times over the years when I had the same feelings toward other people who had showed me a lot of value. I thought about how many of those relationships I had sabotaged by not allowing people to love me.

I became aware that I loved to give to people, but I never liked to receive from them. Still, my behavior. Finally, in desperation I sought the Lord in prayer, "Lord, do You know what is wrong with me? This was a revealing question. I was actually fairly nervous about finding out what was wrong with me because I had lived in denial a long time.

John Maxwell once said, "People change when they hurt enough they have to change, they learn enough they want to change, or they receive enough they are able to change.

Jesus said, "The problem with you is that you don't love yourself enough to feel worthy of thirty thousand dollars. You're afraid that if that generous guy gets to know you, he'll be sorry he gave you the money. That is why you don't want him to get close to you. I could no longer deny that I needed help. I asked,"What should I do? When you do, you will expect people to love you more as they get to know you better!

I was stunned. I could not believe what was at the root of my problem. Until this point the love I lacked for myself had never been exposed like that. I knew that others loved me particularly my wife and kids , and I knew the Lord loved me. I didn't realize that I didn't love myself. Through that experience I learned that whenever someone values us more than we value ourselves we tend to sabotage our relationship with that person.

Secretly, we don't want them to get close enough to find out. From my observation as a pastor, one of the best examples of this are adult singles who are looking for a mate and can't seem to find the "right person" or someone "good enough.

They are afraid that their lover will look deep within and see the imperfections they're convinced they see. It is about time that we learn to love ourselves the way God loves us and see ourselves with our Father's eyes.

I mentioned earlier that when you are trained to feel insignificant, you develop survival skills to try to avoid the pain of that reality. A pauper uses survival skills because he believes that life is one big "dog eat dog" world. This poverty mentality is the primary attribute of a pauper.

Whether a pauper has experienced poverty in his or her finances or in love and affirmation, all paupers have the common belief that there's never going to be enough for them. They live in fear, struggling with the feeling that the well is about to dry up. God never intended for us to live in poverty in any area of our lives. The Bible is full of promises of God's provision for His people.

Solomon said, "I have been young and now I am old, yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken or his descendants begging bread" Prov Jesus made it even clearer when He said, Do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them.

Are you not worth much more than they? And who. And why are you worried about clothing? Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin, yet I say to you that not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these.

But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the furnace, will He not much more clothe you? You of little faith! Do not worry then, saying, "What will we eat? But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. So do not worry about tomorrow; for tomorrow will care for itself.

Each day has enough trouble of its own Matthew 6: Eddie grew up in physical poverty, but his attitudes and behavior typify the survival mindset that can be seen in people who grow up in financially stable homes but experience lack in other areas of their lives. The Department ordered all the kids who were on probation in Lewiston to come to our youth group.

Twice a week we played basketball and volleyball and then at halftime I would preach to them. Eddie was a year-old young man who came every week. Eddie's mom and dad were both drug addicts so Eddie was left on his own to raise himself. He was a tall, olive-skinned, brown-haired kid. Although he wasn't on probation, he loved to play basketball with us.

He hung out in the projects with the rough kids but he was usually pretty quiet. Little by little we got to know him. About a year after we met Eddie we decided to try to adopt him.

We did some research and we discovered that there were two ways to gain custody of him. We could convince his divorced parents to sign over custody to us or we could go to court and fight for him. We decided to try to convince his parents. I took Eddie to his mother's apartment like I had done many times before he used to stay with us on the weekends , but this time I went to the door with him.

My heart was racing and I noticed that were no lights on inside. I thought no one was home, but as Eddie forced the door open I could see a figure sitting on the floor, huddled close to the corner of the dark room. It was his mom. There was no furniture, and it was filthy beyond description. The room was freezing.

I learned later that they hadn't had electricity in months. His mother was obviously experiencing a "crash" after a drug high. She was shaking, her eyes were set in deep black circles, and her hair was matted and stringy.

She looked up at me and asked, "What are you doing here? She glanced up at Eddie who was choking back tears,"Okay,you can have it! We left there and drove to Lewiston to talk to Eddie's dad. It was quiet in the car, as my mind was flooded with images of what I had just seen. My heart was heavy and broken. I wondered how many more "Eddies" there were out there in the world. I could only hope for the best when I imagined what his father would be like.

About 30 minutes later we arrived at his dad's house. It looked like a typical drug home. The front yard was jam-packed with old cars and junk. As we approached the front door, my heart raced, and I saw that the door.

Eddie went in ahead of me and I followed. As we entered the house I noticed that there were several men and women sitting on the floor. A few others were lying on couches. The room was filled with smoke. A short stocky man covered with tattoos was staring at us.

He said in an angry voice, "What do you want? He looked over at Eddie who was hanging his head and said, "Do you want to live with him? We left immediately. I was glad to leave there without a fistfight, and Eddie was excited to start his new life. The next year was filled with much laughter and a lot of tears as Eddie adjusted to his new lifestyle.

Little by little, we began to recognize the characteristics of a poverty mind-set in Eddie. It obviously had been formed in his heart by his grueling childhood. We ate dinner together as a family most of the time. While we ate our meals Eddie would keep his eye on the food that was left.

There was always plenty, but Eddie seemed concerned that we would run out. When the bowls would get about half full he would fill his plate again and then hide food all around his plate and in his napkin. The rest of us would just pretend that we didn't notice, but it made us sad. Eddie's first Christmas with us was exciting. We learned that he had never really had a Christmas because his mom would sell any gifts he received for drugs.

We decided to go to the extreme and shower the kids with presents. We spent hundreds of dollars and distributed the money equally among all of them. There were so many gifts we could barely see. Finally Christmas Day came and we sat down together to open gifts. The whole family was having a blast watching Eddie open his gifts. He was like a little kid. The only problem was that he wouldn't let anyone hold his gifts once they were opened.

Later on in the evening, after dinner, Eddie whispered something in Kathy's ear. Kathy had stockings for each of the kids and filled them with small gifts.

Jason and Eddie both had comic books in their stockings. The only problem was that she had accidentally put four comic books in Jason's and only two in Eddie's.

Eddie wanted to know why Jason got more than he got. Eddie was always afraid he would not have enough. A poverty spirit usually leads paupers to develop a survival mentality. The fear of lack is based on lies, and until those lies are broken, people can't recognize God's provision for their lives. When Eddie became part of our family he had everything he needed and wanted. His old life was gone. But until he stopped believing those lies he couldn't relax and enjoy life with us.

Thankfully, Eddie is free from his old mind-set. He has grown up to be an amazing young man and has graduated from college. We are very proud of him. Paupers have a poverty mentality. They always feel like their resources are limited. They believe that when someone else receives something, it takes away some of the provision that could be theirs. They surmise that someone else's blessing costs them.

The story of the prodigal son from Luke 15 illustrates this point clearly.

Having squandered his inheritance, the youngest son came home seeking refuge. His father was so excited to see him that he threw him a party. He had been saving the fattened calf for such an occasion, and finally it was time to celebrate. Everyone came to the festivity except for the elder brother; he stayed out in the field.

When his father didn't see the older brother at the party, he went looking for him. You, my son, are a pauper who has become a king. He took me to various Scriptures and showed me how important it is for His leaders to carry themselves as princes and princesses because we are sons and daughters of the King.

The first example He showed me was Moses. He asked me, "Do you know why Moses had to be raised in Pharaoh's house? Moses had to be raised in Pharaoh's house so that he would learn how to be a prince and not have a slave's mentality.

A leader who is in slavery internally cannot free those who are in slavery externally. The first 40 years of Moses' life were just as important as the 40 years he spent in the wilderness.

I began to imagine what it must have been like for him to be raised as a son of the king. He would have always known he was significant. He would have been used to people paying attention to what he said and did. He would have been accustomed to being accepted and loved.

I am sure The Plight of Pauperhood 19 that everyone would laugh at his jokes, even when they weren't funny! Because Moses knew he was significant, he had confidence. I saw that without that confidence he would probably have never felt empowered to do anything to help his Hebrew brothers. In fact, if he'd been raised as a slave, it might never have occurred to him to do anything about the injustice he perceived.

As a prince and a Hebrew, the contrast between his situation and theirs created a conflict in his soul that he had to do something about. It was unjust that he was well-treated and they weren't. They were significant too. Unfortunately, when he first tried to step in to help them, their slave mentality kept them from understanding where he was coming from.

He thought they deserved to be treated like he was, but they thought he was just trying to be important when he really wasn't: "Who made you a prince? The more I thought about the kind of person Moses must have been, the more I saw what kind of people we can be when we have been taught that we are significant and are not insecure about who we are.

I also saw that I was not like Moses. As I will describe in the next chapter, I was not raised with the idea that I was significant. This caused me to develop a whole set of behaviors that someone like Moses would probably have never displayed. Even after I got saved, many of these behaviors stayed around. I saw that Nancy's confrontation was about more than her simply being sensitive and me being misunderstood, which was the way I wanted to interpret it.

It was about me doing things that I've always done, but which are no longer consistent with who God says that I am. Most importantly, I saw that if I continued to do those things, I would, as the Lord had said, ultimately destroy the people I was trying to lead. I knew this confrontation was probably one of many to come on the road out of pauperhood and into my identity as a prince.

I also knew that if I didn't begin to travel that road, it would not only cost me tremendously, but also those around me. Because this training began while I was in a position of leadership in my home church, the Lord has made it clear that what I was learning was not just to transform me, but to equip me to help promote a culture of royalty around me. This has resulted in my having the privilege of overseeing a school of ministry where the primary goal is to teach believers how to walk as princes and princesses.

Before we started the school the Lord told me, "I want you to teach the students how to behave in the presence of royalty. They are called to royalty, to influence, and to rule and reign. As forerunners, I'm going to make you a people of influence. I pray that as you come along with me on this journey you will discover your own identity as a prince or princess and begin to experience all the benefits of living in the King's palace!

The circumstances of my birth and my upbringing caused me to believe lies about myself that kept me from the reality of my identity in Christ. My mother was the head high school cheerleader and my father was the star football player when they fell in love with each other. It was a storybook love affair until my mother became pregnant with me out of wedlock. It was the s, a time when society attached a lot more shame to immorality than it does today.

When my grandfather my mom's father found out that she was pregnant, he disowned both my mom and dad even though they had run away and married before I was born. A year later, my father surprised my grandfather by coming to the back door of his house. Before my grandfather had a chance to send him away, my dad dropped to knees and begged for forgiveness. Two years later, just a year after my sister was born, my father was fishing when a huge storm suddenly came up and capsized the boat.

My father rescued my uncle, taking him to shore, and then went back to retrieve the boat. He never returned. My father drowned on that stormy night in That same night a search-and-rescue team was organized to find my dad.

At around midnight, my grandfather pulled him up off of the bottom of Anderson Dam. My life and the life of my family were changed forever. My father's death created a deep sense of loss and fear of abandonment in my soul. Of course, three-year-olds don't understand what the meaning of death is.

All I knew was that he was gone and I feared that my mother would be next. For many years after that, I would get up several times a night and wander into my mother's bedroom, checking to see if she was still there. She told me years later that she would often wake up and find me standing by her bed just staring at her. Our first stepfather came into our lives when I was five years old.

He made it clear to my sister and me that he married my mother and we were just the baggage that came along with the prize.

Bill Johnson & Kris Vallotton - The Supernatural Ways of Royalty.pdf

To make matters worse, he was a violent alcoholic. Brutality became a way of life for us. The house rules for survival were to "Shut up and stay out of the way. Once, while he was drunk, he held me up by one hand, pulled my pants down, and began to beat me with his belt buckle. Blood started running down both my legs. My mother, screaming and crying, finally managed to pull me free of him.

Castle Tramps or Palace Princes 23 Beyond being physically abusive, my stepfather seemed to have an agenda to rid us of all our memories of my real father.

He was very jealous of my mother's love and would torment us when she showed us any affection. He destroyed all of our father's belongings and prohibited us from seeing any of our father's relatives. Looking back, I can see that the devil was using him to destroy our identities. My mother finally divorced him when I was 13 years old. When I was 15, my mother remarried again. Miserably, the house rules remained the same.

Violence continued and survival depended on all of us children becoming invisible and remaining inconspicuous.

Unfortunately, I know that what I experienced growing up is all too common. The circumstances may differ, but those of us who experienced abandonment and abuse in our youth, even if it was simply being born in an "untimely manner" as I was, internalize a message that we are shameful, unwanted, and insignificant.

The result of these lies is that we develop patterns of behavior that are designed to protect us in a hostile world. Because we've experienced attacks at the most fundamental levels of our identity, we think we have to do whatever it takes to kill the pain and simply survive. One of my survival tactics was to develop a sarcastic sense of humor. My humor revolved around cutting people down and making them feel stupid and insignificant.

Of course, I usually didn't realize I was making them feel bad, but subconsciously, I thought that destroying other people's self-esteem helped me feel better about myself. I would joke with people about their shortcomings, thinking I was just being funny, yet every laugh cost someone a piece of their heart.

Even though I found Christ at age 18, it was many years before I dealt with my low self-esteem. As a result, my behavior continued and I still didn't have a clue how badly I was devastating people with my humor. I should have understood it, because I was the main victim of my own humor. I often made my faults the brunt of my own jokes.

The culture of pain imprisoned my soul within me, but the Lord was determined to help me make a jail break. The greater revelation, to me, was that people valued what I had to say. I had always believed what my stepfathers had drilled into me: People didn't really care what I thought or said. The realization that I had value began the process of uprooting the lies I believed about myself and helped me find out who I actually was. God had called me a prince, and I realized that the meeting with Nancy and the interaction I had with the Lord would just be the first of many steps that God would use to lead me out of my prison and into His palace.

I had another encounter about a year later that became the next step in my journey out of pauperhood. It began on a cold, winter Sunday evening in December. I arrived at the church late, and as I opened the front door of the building, the wind nearly blew the door off its hinges.

The prayer meeting was already well underway when I entered the room. About a hundred people were passionately praying so I tried to slip in quietly so as not to disturb the meeting. As I cleared the door, Bill, our senior leader, greeted me. He had the strangest grin on his face. He handed me something that was folded in half. I was confused by his expression as I stared at the piece of paper. I finally realized that it was a check, but my disbelieving eyes struggled to communicate the amount with my brain.

As it dawned on me, I began yelling, "Someone just gave me three thousand dollars! I almost passed out. I started jumping up and down yelling, "Thirty thousand dollars! I looked at the signature and realized that I didn't even know the person who had given me the money. This mystery definitely thickened the plot and added to the excitement. Many days passed before I finally discovered the benevolent man's identity. He was new to our fellowship and had attended a class that I had taught earlier in the year.

One night while he was praying, he felt the Lord tell him to give me a portion of his inheritance. I wrote him a card expressing my gratitude but the strangest thing happened next.

I completely avoided him for several months after he gave me that unbelievable gift.

At first, what I was doing wasn't so obvious, yet as time went on it became more apparent. I would see him in a certain room in the church and I would turn around and walk the other direction. On one occasion, I ran to the men's restroom, wondering if I was going to make it there on time, and just as I entered the bathroom I noticed he was there. His back was turned toward me and he hadn't seen me, so I ran out.

I had to run all the way to the other side of the building to find another restroom. As I was racing around the building the thought struck me, "Something is wrong with me! When I got into bed that night I couldn't sleep. It was cold and dark and the wind was howling. It seemed like I lay there forever. I kept looking at the clock, waiting for the day to dawn, tossing and turning and pondering why I was behaving so peculiarly. I couldn't get my poor behavior out of my head.

My mind turned to other times over the years when I had the same feelings toward other people who had showed me a lot of value. I thought about how many of those relationships I had sabotaged by not allowing people to love me.

I became aware that I loved to give to people, but I never liked to receive from them. Finally, in desperation I sought the Lord in prayer, "Lord, do You know what is wrong with me?

This was a revealing question. I was actually fairly nervous about finding out what was wrong with me because I had lived in denial a long time. John Maxwell once said, "People change when they hurt enough they have to change, they learn enough they want to change, or they receive enough they are able to change.

Jesus said, "The problem with you is that you don't love yourself enough to feel worthy of thirty thousand dollars. You're afraid that if that generous guy gets to know you, he'll be sorry he gave you the money.

That is why you don't want him to get close to you. I could no longer deny that I needed help. I asked,"What should I do? When you do, you will expect people to love you more as they get to know you better!

I was stunned. I could not believe what was at the root of my problem. Until this point the love I lacked for myself had never been exposed like that. I knew that others loved me particularly my wife and kids , and I knew the Lord loved me. I didn't realize that I didn't love myself.

Through that experience I learned that whenever someone values us more than we value ourselves we tend to sabotage our relationship with that person. Secretly, we don't want them to get close enough to find out Castle Tramps or Palace Princes 27 that we aren't as good as they think we are.

From my observation as a pastor, one of the best examples of this are adult singles who are looking for a mate and can't seem to find the "right person" or someone "good enough. They are afraid that their lover will look deep within and see the imperfections they're convinced they see. It is about time that we learn to love ourselves the way God loves us and see ourselves with our Father's eyes. I mentioned earlier that when you are trained to feel insignificant, you develop survival skills to try to avoid the pain of that reality.

A pauper uses survival skills because he believes that life is one big "dog eat dog" world. This poverty mentality is the primary attribute of a pauper. Whether a pauper has experienced poverty in his or her finances or in love and affirmation, all paupers have the common belief that there's never going to be enough for them. They live in fear, struggling with the feeling that the well is about to dry up.

God never intended for us to live in poverty in any area of our lives.

The Bible is full of promises of God's provision for His people. Solomon said, "I have been young and now I am old, yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken or his descendants begging bread" Prov Jesus made it even clearer when He said, Do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on.

Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not worth much more than they? And why are you worried about clothing? Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin, yet I say to you that not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these.

But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the furnace, will He not much more clothe you? You of little faith! Do not worry then, saying, "What will we eat? But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. So do not worry about tomorrow; for tomorrow will care for itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own Matthew Eddie grew up in physical poverty, but his attitudes and behavior typify the survival mindset that can be seen in people who grow up in financially stable homes but experience lack in other areas of their lives.

The Department ordered all the kids who were on probation in Lewiston to come to our youth group. Twice a week we played basketball and volleyball and then at halftime I would preach to them. Eddie was a year-old young man who came every week. Eddie's mom and dad were both drug addicts so Eddie was left on his own to raise himself.

He was a tall, olive-skinned, brown-haired kid. Although he wasn't on probation, he loved to play basketball with us. He hung out in the projects with the rough kids but he was usually pretty quiet. Castle Tramps or Palace Princes 29 Little by little we got to know him. About a year after we met Eddie we decided to try to adopt him. We did some research and we discovered that there were two ways to gain custody of him.

We could convince his divorced parents to sign over custody to us or we could go to court and fight for him. We decided to try to convince his parents. I took Eddie to his mother's apartment like I had done many times before he used to stay with us on the weekends , but this time I went to the door with him.

My heart was racing and I noticed that were no lights on inside. I thought no one was home, but as Eddie forced the door open I could see a figure sitting on the floor, huddled close to the corner of the dark room. It was his mom. There was no furniture, and it was filthy beyond description.

The room was freezing. I learned later that they hadn't had electricity in months. His mother was obviously experiencing a "crash" after a drug high. She was shaking, her eyes were set in deep black circles, and her hair was matted and stringy.

She looked up at me and asked, "What are you doing here? She glanced up at Eddie who was choking back tears,"Okay,you can have it! We left there and drove to Lewiston to talk to Eddie's dad.

It was quiet in the car, as my mind was flooded with images of what I had just seen. My heart was heavy and broken. I wondered how many more "Eddies" there were out there in the world. I could only hope for the best when I imagined what his father would be like. About 30 minutes later we arrived at his dad's house. It looked like a typical drug home.

The front yard was jam-packed with old cars and junk. Eddie went in ahead of me and I followed. As we entered the house I noticed that there were several men and women sitting on the floor.A dear friend and mentor of mine, Darol Blunt, lived a life of grace. I had always believed what my stepfathers had drilled into me: People didn't really care what I thought or said. Meanwhile back on earth, God's people are rising and beginning to shine in this present darkness. The divine nature permeates our souls, transforms our minds, transplants our hearts, and transfigures our spirits.

It is a privilege to serve with you all. He would have always known he was significant. Most of us are still looking at our provision what our bank statement says to help us determine our vision, and therefore are living within our means instead of His blessings. You are devastating people with your words. After all, I thought, Nancy is very sensitive and I have been used to being "misunderstood" most of my life.

Therefore, to the weak in faith, confidence appears to be arrogance.

KANDRA from Muskegon
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