KAMASUTRA ORIGINAL PDF

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literature, and which is called the 'Vatsyayana Kama Sutra', or Aphorisms on. Love .. A complete translation of the original work now follows. and mind. Some of the sexual poses in the Kama Sutra are yoga positions, and the . The original Kama Sutra text dealt with a lot more than just sex, but in this. The Kamasutra contains pictures. It should be noted, that the book contains almost none of the original illustrations. Everything, that a single publication may .


Kamasutra Original Pdf

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Free PDF, epub, site ebook. The Kama Sutra is an ancient Indian text which is considered the primary Sanskrit work on human sexuality. It was written by. literature, and which is called the `Vatsyayana Kama Sutra', or Aphorisms on. Love . related, and moreover as the original work of Babhravya was difficult to be. PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. As of today we have 78,, eBooks for you to download for free. No annoying ads, no download limits, enjoy .

In short, an intelligent and knowing person attending to Dharma and Artha and also to Kama, without becoming the slave of his passions, will obtain success in everything that he may do.

It is supposed that he must have lived between the first and sixth century of the Christian era, on the following grounds.

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He mentions that Satakarni Satavahana, a king of Kuntal, killed Malayevati his wife with an instrument called kartari by striking her in the passion of love, and Vatsya quotes this case to warn people of the danger arising from some old customs of striking women when under the influence of this passion. Now this king of Kuntal is believed to have lived and reigned during the first century A.

On the other hand, Virahamihira, in the eighteenth chapter of his 'Brihatsanhita', treats of the science of love, and appears to have borrowed largely from Vatsyayana on the subject. Now Virahamihira is said to have lived during the sixth century A. On the text of the 'Aphorisms on Love', by Vatsyayana, only two commentaries have been found. One called 'Jayamangla' or 'Sutrabashya', and the other 'Sutra vritti'. The date of the 'Jayamangla' is fixed between the tenth and thirteenth century A.

Again, the copy of the commentary procured was evidently a transcript of a manuscript which once had a place in the library of a Chaulukyan king named Vishaladeva, a fact elicited from the following sentence at the end of it.

The copy of the manuscript obtained in Bombay was defective, and so the pundits wrote to Benares, Calcutta and Jeypoor for copies of the manuscript from Sanscrit libraries in those places.

The Kama Sutra

Copies having been obtained, they were then compared with each other, and with the aid of a Commentary called 'Jayamangla' a revised copy of the entire manuscript was prepared, and from this copy the English translation was made.

The following is the certificate of the chief pundit: I had the assistance of a Commentary called "Jayamangla" for correcting the portion in the first five parts, but found great difficulty in correcting the remaining portion, because, with the exception of one copy thereof which was tolerably correct, all the other copies I had were far too incorrect.

However, I took that portion as correct in which the majority of the copies agreed with each other.

The whole consists of seven parts, thirty-six chapters, and sixty-four paragraphs. Hardly anything is known about the author.

His real name is supposed to be Mallinaga or Mrillana, Vatsyayana being his family name. At the close of the work this is what he writes about himself: This work is not to be used merely as an instrument for satisfying our desires. A person acquainted with the true principles of this science, who preserves his Dharma virtue or religious merit , his Artha worldly wealth and his Kama pleasure or sensual gratification , and who has regard to the customs of the people, is sure to obtain the mastery over his senses.

In short, an intelligent and knowing person attending to Dharma and Artha and also to Kama, without becoming the slave of his passions, will obtain success in everything that he may do.

It is supposed that he must have lived between the first and sixth century of the Christian era, on the following grounds. He mentions that Satakarni Satavahana, a king of Kuntal, killed Malayevati his wife with an instrument called kartari by striking her in the passion of love, and Vatsya quotes this case to warn people of the danger arising from some old customs of striking women when under the influence of this passion. Now this king of Kuntal is believed to have lived and reigned during the first century A.

In contemporary translations, this has been inaccurately rendered as "eunuch" — or, a castrated man in a harem, [note 1] a practice that started in India after the arrival of Turkish Sultans.

The Kamasutra does not use the pejorative term kliba at all, but speaks instead of a "third nature" or, in the sexual behavior context as the "third sexuality". In one of the longest consecutive sets of verses describing a sexual act, the Kamasutra describes fellatio technique between a man dressed like a woman performing fellatio on another man.

The historical records suggest that the Kamasutra was a well-known and popular text in Indian history, states Wendy Doniger. This popularity through the Mughal Empire era is confirmed by its regional translations.

The Kama Sutra

The Mughals, states Doniger, had "commissioned lavishly illustrated Persian and Sanskrit Kamasutra manuscripts". He did not translate it, but did edit it to suit the Victorian British attitudes. The unedited translation was produced by the Indian scholar Bhagwan Lal Indraji with the assistance of a student Shivaram Parshuram Bhide, under the guidance of Burton's friend, the Indian civil servant Forster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot. The "Hindus were cowering under their scorn", states Doniger, and the open discussion of sex in the Kamasutra scandalized the 19th-century Europeans.

Yet, states Doniger, it became soon after its publication in , "one of the most pirated books in the English language", widely copied, reprinted and republished sometimes without Richard Burton's name.

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First, he had the courage to publish it in the colonial era against the political and cultural mores of the British elite. He creatively found a way to subvert the then prevalent censorship laws of Britain under the Obscene Publications Act of For example, the original Sanskrit Kamasutra does not use the words lingam or yoni for sexual organs, and almost always uses other terms. Burton adroitly avoided being viewed as obscene to the Victorian mindset by avoiding the use of words such as penis, vulva, vagina and other direct or indirect sexual terms in the Sanskrit text to discuss sex, sexual relationships and human sexual positions.

Burton used the terms lingam and yoni instead throughout the translation. However, Burton's Kamasutra gave a unique, specific meaning to these words in the western imagination. First, the text "simply does not say what Burton says it says".

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Third, it changes the force of words in the original text. For example, when a woman says "Stop! It has led to a misunderstanding of the text and created the wrong impression of it being ancient "Hindu pornography".

Upadhyaya published his translation as the Kamasutra of Vatsyayana: Complete Translation from the Original.During sex, the text recommends going with the flow and mirroring with abhiyoga and samprayoga. Bell, M.

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It contains ten chapters, and has been translated into English, but only six copies were printed for private circulation. This popularity through the Mughal Empire era is confirmed by its regional translations. All sex positions 2 3 4 5.

It is called 'Kalogynomia: or the Laws of Female Beauty,' being the elementary principles of that science, by T. Detailed descriptions then follow of the Chitrini or Art woman; the Shankhini or Conch woman, and the Hastini or Elephant woman, their days of enjoyment, their various seats of passion, the manner in which they should be manipulated and treated in sexual intercourse, along with the 5 characteristics of the men and women of the various countries in Hindostan.

The Kamasutra comprises of 7 parts, each of which, in its turn, is divided into several chapters. For instance, according to Vatsyayana the lalatika form enables both to feel each other and allows the man to visually appreciate "the full beauty of the female form", states S.

But here it is treated in a plain, simple, matter of fact sort of way.

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