RICH DAD POOR DAD FULL BOOK

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“Mom,” he continued, “I don't want to work as hard as you and dad do. You make a lot of . entire test group-to get out of the “Rat Race” that day. I was out . After reading the scattered sections, I decided the book had merit and needed to be What follows is the story of Robert's two dads, a rich one and a poor one, that. click here to download rich dad poor dad pdf for free - bestthing.info Robert Kiyosaki challenged conventional wisdom with his In , Robert's book, Rich. I began writing it after my other book became a best seller, but I never finished CHAPTER ONE Rich Dad, Poor Dad As narrated by Robert Kiyosaki I had two.


Rich Dad Poor Dad Full Book

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Rate this book. Clear rating To ask other readers questions about Rich Dad, Poor Dad, please sign up. Popular .. But here's the thing - I'm 28 years old, married with no kids, spent the better part of the last 10 years at uni and I work full time. “Rich Dad Poor Dad is a starting point for anyone looking to If you download this book without a cover, or download a PDF, jpg, or tiff copy of life complete. xii. Through my book Rich Dad Poor Dad, I shared the experiences that made me successful so others could begin to see money and finances in a whole new way.

One lets you off the hook, and the other forces you to think. By asking the question How can I afford it? He did not mean that you should download everything you want. He was fanatical about exercising your mind, the most powerful computer in the world.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

The stronger it gets, the more money I can make. Although both dads worked hard, I noticed that one dad had a habit of putting his brain to sleep when it came to finances, and the other had a habit of exercising his brain.

The long-term result was that one dad grew stronger financially, and the other grew weaker. It is not much different from a person who goes to the gym to exercise on a regular basis versus someone who sits on the couch watching television.

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Proper physical exercise increases your chances for health, and proper mental exercise increases your chances for wealth. My two dads had opposing attitudes and that affected the way they thought. One dad thought that the rich should pay more in taxes to take care of those less fortunate. One dad recommended, Study hard so you can find a good company to work for. The other recommended, Study hard so you can find a good company to download. The other said, The reason I must be rich is because I have you kids.

One encouraged talking about money and business at the dinner table, while the other forbade the subject of money to be discussed over a meal. One said, When it comes to money, play it safe.

The other said, Learn to manage risk. One believed, Our home is our largest investment and our greatest asset. Both dads paid their bills on time, yet one paid his bills first while the other paid his bills last.

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One dad believed in a company or the government taking care of you and your needs. He was always concerned about pay raises, retirement plans, medical benefits, sick leave, vacation days, and other perks. He was impressed with two of his uncles who joined the military and earned a retirement-and-entitlement package for life after twenty years of active service. He loved the idea of medical benefits and PX privileges the military provided its retirees. He also loved the tenure system available through the university.

The idea of job protection for life and job benefits seemed more important, at times, than the job. The other believed in total financial self-reliance. He spoke out against the entitlement mentality and how it created weak and financially needy people. He was emphatic about being financially competent. One dad struggled to save a few dollars. The other created investments.

The other taught me how to write strong business and financial plans so I could create jobs. I noticed that people really do shape their lives through their thoughts.

And that prophecy became reality. My rich dad, on the other hand, always referred to himself as rich. Even when he was flat broke after a major financial setback, he continued to refer to himself as a rich man.

He would cover himself by saying, There is a difference between being poor and being broke. Broke is temporary. Poor is eternal. My rich dad always said, Money is power. The power of our thoughts may never be measured or appreciated, but it became obvious to me as a young boy that it was important to be aware of my thoughts and how I expressed myself.

I noticed that my poor dad was poor, not because of the amount of money he earned, which was significant, but because of his thoughts and actions. As a young boy having two fathers, I became acutely aware of being careful about which thoughts I chose to adopt as my own. Should I listen to my rich dad or to my poor dad?

Although both men had tremendous respect for education and learning, they disagreed about what they thought was important to learn. One wanted me to study hard, earn a degree, and get a good job to earn money. He wanted me to study to become a professional, an attorney or an accountant, and to go to business school for my MBA.

The other encouraged me to study to be rich, to understand how money works, and to learn how to have it work for me. Money works for me!

At the age of nine, I decided to listen to and learn from my rich dad about money. In doing so, I chose not to listen to my poor dad, even though he was the one with all the college degrees. Robert Frost is my favorite poet. I use its lesson almost daily. Once I made up my mind about whom to listen to, my education about money began.

My rich dad taught me over a period of 30 years until I was 39 years old. He stopped once he realized that I knew and fully understood what he had been trying to drum into my often-thick skull. Money is one form of power. But what is more powerful is financial education. Money comes and goes, but if you have the education about how money works, you gain power over it and can begin building wealth.

The reason positive thinking alone does not work is because most people went to school and never learned how money works, so they spend their lives working for money. Because I was only nine years old when I started, the lessons my rich dad taught me were simple. And when it was all said and done, there were only six main lessons, repeated over 30 years.

This book is about those six lessons, put as simply as possible, just as simply as my rich dad put forth those lessons to me. The lessons are meant not to be answers, but guideposts that will assist you and your children to grow wealthier no matter what happens in a world of increasing change and uncertainty.

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Dad, can you tell me how to get rich? My dad put down the evening paper. Why do you want to get rich, Son? My dad silently shook his head, pushed his glasses up the bridge of his nose, and went back to reading the paper. I stood waiting for an answer. The year was I was nine years old. By some twist of fate, I attended the same public school where the rich people sent their kids.

We were primarily a sugar-plantation town. The managers of the plantation and the other affluent people, such as doctors, business owners, and bankers, sent their children to this elementary school.

Book Review: Rich Dad, Poor Dad (this books irks me)

After grade six, their children were generally sent off to private schools. Because my family lived on one side of the street, I went to this school. Had I lived on the other side of the street, I would have gone to a different school with kids from families more like mine. After grade six, these kids and I would go on to the public intermediate and high school. There was no private school for them or for me.

My dad finally put down the paper. I could tell he was thinking. Well, Son…, he began slowly. If you want to be rich, you have to learn to make money. Well, use your head, Son, he said, smiling. The next morning, I told my best friend, Mike, what my dad had said.

As best as I could tell, Mike and I were the only poor kids in this school. Mike was also in this school by a twist of fate. Someone had drawn a jog in the line for the school district, and we wound up in school with the rich kids.

Mom and Dad provided us with the basics, like food, shelter, and clothes.

But that was about it. My dad used to say, If you want something, work for it. We wanted things, but there was not much work available for nine-year-old boys. He agreed, and so on that Saturday morning, Mike became my first business partner. We spent all morning coming up with ideas on how to make money. It hurt a little, but that hurt was good, because it inspired us to keep thinking of a way to make money.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Finally, that afternoon, a bolt of lightning struck. It was an idea Mike got from a science book he had read. Excitedly, we shook hands, and the partnership now had a business. For the next several weeks, Mike and I ran around our neighborhood, knocking on doors and asking our neighbors if they would save their toothpaste tubes for us.

With puzzled looks, most adults consented with a smile. My mom grew distressed as the weeks wore on. We had selected a site next to her washing machine as the place we would stockpile our raw materials. In a brown cardboard box that. This action might not be possible to undo. Are you sure you want to continue?

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Summary Anyone stuck in the rat-race of living paycheck to paycheck, enslaved by the house mortgage and bills, will appreciate this breath of fresh air. Read on the Scribd mobile app Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Robert T. Kiyosaki Released: Apr 25, ISBN: Introduction - Rich Dad Poor Dad Having two dads offered me the choice of contrasting points of view: There is a difference between being poor and being broke. The Road Not Taken Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black.

Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads onto way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence; Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

And that has made all the difference.

The rich have money work for them. They did? Yeah, they did, I replied in a hurt tone.

Rich Dad, Poor Dad

How do I make money? I asked. So what do we do to make money? Mike asked. But do you want to be my partner? Start your free 30 days. Page 1 of 1. Sharon Lechter was introduced to Robert Kiyosaki by her husband, a patent lawyer. Koyosaki wanted to patent an educational game called "Cashflow" aimed at improving what he calls young peoples financial intelligence. One thing leads to another and they eventually colaborated in producing this book which is essentially a financial biography of Kiyosaki.

The Rich Dad, Poor Dad of the title are his real father, the superintendent of education for Hawaii poor and the businessman father of a schoolfriend rich. He says that at age 9 he decided to follow the advice of his rich dad and contrasts it with the advice of his poor dad throughout the book. For example, poor dad says, "Love of money is the root of all evil", but rich dad says, "The lack of money is the root of all evil" and he follows rich dad, making the money but proving that his poor dad was right on the moral aspects.

Rich dad says, "The rich don't pay taxes, that's only for the poor and middle class", or Kiyosaki; "In real estate I make an offer with the words, "Subject to approval of my business partner" He hugs a manageress in one of his shops and says that she is like a mother to him, then in the next breath gives a warning that "you'll wind up like Mrs Martin".

He could have said that he respected her for her loyalty and good work but he clearly doesn't. If Kiyosaki had been aboard the Titanic you would undoubtedly have found him hiding behind the women and children in the first life raft, but in non critical situations he has some useful things to say about financial management.

His idea that an asset is only an asset if it makes you money is a good one. If you take a large mortgage to download a private residence then it is a drain on your resources although an accountant would class it as an asset.

He's also good on the importance of clear thinking. As he says, "Most people do not know that it is their emotions that are doing the thinking. One was highly educated and intelligent; he had a Ph. He then went on to Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and Northwestern University to do his advanced studies, all on full financial scholarships. The other father never finished the eighth grade. Both men were successful in their careers, working hard all their lives.

Both earned substantial incomes. Yet one struggled financially all his life. The other would become one of the richest men in Hawaii.

One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities and his church. The other left bills to be paid. Both men were strong, charismatic and influential. For example, one dad would say, The love of money is the root of all evil. The other said, The lack of money is the root of all evil. As a young boy, having two strong fathers both influencing me was difficult. I wanted to be a good son and listen, but the two fathers did not say the same things. The contrast in their points of view, particularly about money, was so extreme that I grew curious and intrigued.

I began to start thinking for long periods of time about what each was saying. Much of my private time was spent reflecting, asking myself questions such as, Why does he say that? I agree with that. Instead, having two dads whom I loved forced me to think and ultimately choose a way of thinking for myself. As a process, choosing for myself turned out to be much more valuable in the long run than simply accepting or rejecting a single point of view.

One of the reasons the rich get richer, the poor get poorer, and the middle class struggles in debt is that the subject of money is taught at home, not in school. Most of us learn about money from our parents. So what can poor parents tell their child about money?

They simply say, Stay in school and study hard. Sadly, money is not taught in schools. Schools focus on scholastic and professional skills, but not on financial skills. This explains how smart bankers, doctors, and accountants who earned excellent grades may struggle financially all of their lives.We learn to walk by falling down.

View all 23 comments. And besides, more money will not solve the problem.

I've been wanting to read this for a couple of years. View all 9 comments. His idea that an asset is only an asset if it makes you money is a good one.

JASMIN from Providence
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