MUSLIM NAMES PDF

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Thank you for downloading Islamic Relief's guide on baby names for Muslim The third category is the names of Prophets and Messengers – may the peace. Meanings of Muslim Names. Aadab (female)—Hope and need. Aadil (male)— Just. Aalia (female)—Exalted; Highest social standing. Aamaal (female)—Hopes . Names, however, often lack the potential to hold multiple intended messages about Muslim Names the Bosnian Way Muslim in the cities in the s, and.


Muslim Names Pdf

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A Standard Dictionary of Muslim Names. With 99 Ninety Nine. Names of ALLAH. Available From,. ALMINAR BOOKS & GIFTS. p.o. BOX CLAYMONT, DE,-. Muslim Boy Names. 1. Aaban. Name of the Angel. 2. Aabid. Worshiper. 3. Aadil. Just, Upright. 4. Aahil. Prince. 5. Aalam. World. 6. Aalee. Sublime, high. 7. Aalim. Muslim Baby Boys & Girls bestthing.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt ) or read online. Muslim Baby Boys & Girls Names.

Although her life has been lived mainly outside Bosnia-Herzegovina, I have included her here because many of her relatives were situated in Bosnia and she tells about how her family gave names to their children. The name Muhamed was given less often because it was seen as obligating the bearer to be a true Muslim, which could be unsustainable during stormy times, especially under communist rule.

As time went on, those who worked in the cities began to seek more modern names. Mothers wanted their children to have similar names, like Alma for a daughter and Almer for a son, Jasmina and Jasmin, and others that had no real meaning but were merely concocted.

Here we have two versions of it in English: On Doomsday you will be called by your names and the names of your fathers — so chose [sic! Schimmel , 14 It is reported that the Prophet peace be upon him said: The only important thing about names is that they do not have an ugly meaning.

And that they are not characteristic of non-believers. You cannot in Bosnia give a child a name like Marija or for example David, but Merjem or Davud are possible.

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Current Name Books Books on naming often aim to advise parents on the difficult task of giving appropriate names to their children. Here two contemporary guides for Muslim naming are compared, and a book on modern names in Bosnia- Herzegovina is presented. The advice given to parents in these naming guides is very similar; both books naturally recommend giving beautiful names which were names of good examples or good persons. Both warn against giving shortened names as official names.

Both, as expected, advise against names that the Prophet advised against. Name books such as these, of course, take a stand on the question on spelling, as the names are given in writing in the books, so in ambiguous cases the writer needs to choose among alternate spellings. The book includes lists of names characteristic of these three ethnic groups and found in Maglaj in various sources, but predominantly in school registers.

The full list of web materials used in this article is given at the end of the article.

How representative are web discussions on names and naming of the overall discourse on names and naming in the area? The question of whether a part of a social phenomenon is representative of the entire social phenomenon is often difficult to answer in any case; whether anything on the web can be representative of a social phenomenon is perhaps even more difficult to answer, since interaction in writing on the web leaves out many aspects of human interaction.

Perhaps this material is comparable to sampling techniques such as snowball sampling; the selection is not complete, and what you get depends on where you start, as well as persistence, hard work, expertise and good sampling design — and luck.

A general characteristic of all of the web threads used is that most only list names without commentary. When Muslim naming which comes up in all the threads; the Muslim forums are obviously all about Muslim naming is mentioned, the most frequent question is: What then is Muslim in this context? These three categories are described in greater detail below.

In the most frequent situation seen in the discourses in these materials, the parents have found a name and wonder whether it is Muslim, as in the first example below. Please help, I would like to know if Nora is a Muslim name. In two weeks, God willing, our daughter will be born, I found the name on one web page NORA - light but we are not certain that it is a Muslim name. The second name is Lana - delicate. In principal we do not deal with the interpretation of the meaning of individual names because there are volumes on the theme of Muslim names and those who want to know the meaning of individual names may turn to those volumes.

Arabs give the name NUR to female children, and that means light. As far as we know the female name Nura exists in our community, whereas Nora does not. In my opinion he is here advising against choosing that name. There are those who will inquire about whether a name is good or not at their local mosque, and the rijaset is probably a web version of the answer you might get there.

In the web discussion it is not mentioned whether an imam was asked, but there are mentions of other people who have wanted to give the same name who received a negative answer. Within this category there is a sub-group where participants in the naming discussions refer to an authority on Islam such as the international Muslim community, often represented by a website or the customs of a Muslim country.

Many of the questions in this category are also questions on spelling and pronunciation. In the web discussions some of the more unusual spellings reflect a wish to adhere to Arabic. A common comment in this category is seen in the excerpt below, where an individual experience of foreign Muslims is translated into something that is representative of Muslims elsewhere.

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For almost all the names mentioned — they are not strictly Muslim they are not given only to children of the Muslim denomination because people from that region interpret that their name has the importance of a beautiful meaning and not which faith it belongs to.

Here a local foreign community somewhere in the world outside Bosnia has also discussed Bosnian naming and found it strange that names are divided between the nationalities as they are in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Traditional Bosnian Muslim Names The subject of what is Bosnian, reclaiming Bosnian names and using names that are traditional comes up in some of the discussion threads, as the example below states: Although, honestly, I think that we Bosniaks need to preserve and we have a right to Slavonic names … Now I am not talking about the typical names Christians give, but names such as Badema … etc….

For instance, I do not know one Badema who is not Muslim, at least by birth, and Badema is a character in an old Bosnian tale Badem djevojka.

I remember an old grandpa whose name was Karanfil … Also I see nothing bad in searching for names from the Bogumil times … They are our forefathers, the Bosnian language is our language, and I do think it would be indifferent of us to give that up … islambosna.

This is part of an answer on islambosna; the whole thread discusses which names are Muslim and which are not, and this comment is about traditional Bosniak names. A number of posts promote traditional Bosnian Muslim names in addition to the Slavonic ones mentioned in this example such as Alija instead of new, fashionable Muslim names with foreign spellings. In general, I would say that this category of traditional Bosnian Muslim names does not stand out in the web discussions.

It is not probable that a Bosniak parent would need peer support on whether Alija or a similar, traditional name is Muslim or not.

And I would expect that in a later analysis of web discourse, this category would be called traditional Bosniak names, but for now my general impression is that Bosnian Muslim better describes the discourse on these names. Neutral Names Many parents want names that are neutral, either because the parents are of different denominations discussed further below , or because they do not want their child to be marked with a nationality or ethnic group.

In the first example, the Muslimness of this post is unknown. It has been estimated that 1. Mixed marriages are largely avoided in rural settings, but in cities they are rather frequent. When commenting on names in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Sorabji writes: Names always were, and remain today, indications of the affiliation of individuals.

Although her life has been lived mainly outside Bosnia-Herzegovina, I have included her here because many of her relatives were situated in Bosnia and she tells about how her family gave names to their children.

The name Muhamed was given less often because it was seen as obligating the bearer to be a true Muslim, which could be unsustainable during stormy times, especially under communist rule.

As time went on, those who worked in the cities began to seek more modern names. Mothers wanted their children to have similar names, like Alma for a daughter and Almer for a son, Jasmina and Jasmin, and others that had no real meaning but were merely concocted.

Here we have two versions of it in English: On Doomsday you will be called by your names and the names of your fathers — so chose [sic! You cannot in Bosnia give a child a name like Marija or for example David, but Merjem or Davud are possible. Current Name Books Books on naming often aim to advise parents on the difficult task of giving appropriate names to their children.

Here two contemporary guides for Muslim naming are compared, and a book on modern names in Bosnia- Herzegovina is presented. The advice given to parents in these naming guides is very similar; both books naturally recommend giving beautiful names which were names of good examples or good persons. Both warn against giving shortened names as official names. Both, as expected, advise against names that the Prophet advised against. Name books such as these, of course, take a stand on the question on spelling, as the names are given in writing in the books, so in ambiguous cases the writer needs to choose among alternate spellings.

The book includes lists of names characteristic of these three ethnic groups and found in Maglaj in various sources, but predominantly in school registers. The full list of web materials used in this article is given at the end of the article. How representative are web discussions on names and naming of the overall discourse on names and naming in the area? The question of whether a part of a social phenomenon is representative of the entire social phenomenon is often difficult to answer in any case; whether anything on the web can be representative of a social phenomenon is perhaps even more difficult to answer, since interaction in writing on the web leaves out many aspects of human interaction.

Perhaps this material is comparable to sampling techniques such as snowball sampling; the selection is not complete, and what you get depends on where you start, as well as persistence, hard work, expertise and good sampling design — and luck.

A general characteristic of all of the web threads used is that most only list names without commentary. What then is Muslim in this context? These three categories are described in greater detail below. In the most frequent situation seen in the discourses in these materials, the parents have found a name and wonder whether it is Muslim, as in the first example below. Please help, I would like to know if Nora is a Muslim name.

In two weeks, God willing, our daughter will be born, I found the name on one web page NORA - light but we are not certain that it is a Muslim name.

The second name is Lana - delicate. Arabs give the name NUR to female children, and that means light. As far as we know the female name Nura exists in our community, whereas Nora does not. In my opinion he is here advising against choosing that name.

There are those who will inquire about whether a name is good or not at their local mosque, and the rijaset is probably a web version of the answer you might get there. In the web discussion it is not mentioned whether an imam was asked, but there are mentions of other people who have wanted to give the same name who received a negative answer.

Within this category there is a sub-group where participants in the naming discussions refer to an authority on Islam such as the international Muslim community, often represented by a website or the customs of a Muslim country. Many of the questions in this category are also questions on spelling and pronunciation. In the web discussions some of the more unusual spellings reflect a wish to adhere to Arabic.

A common comment in this category is seen in the excerpt below, where an individual experience of foreign Muslims is translated into something that is representative of Muslims elsewhere.

Here a local foreign community somewhere in the world outside Bosnia has also discussed Bosnian naming and found it strange that names are divided between the nationalities as they are in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Traditional Bosnian Muslim Names The subject of what is Bosnian, reclaiming Bosnian names and using names that are traditional comes up in some of the discussion threads, as the example below states: Although, honestly, I think that we Bosniaks need to preserve and we have a right to Slavonic names … Now I am not talking about the typical names Christians give, but names such as Badema … etc….

For instance, I do not know one Badema who is not Muslim, at least by birth, and Badema is a character in an old Bosnian tale Badem djevojka. I remember an old grandpa whose name was Karanfil … Also I see nothing bad in searching for names from the Bogumil times … They are our forefathers, the Bosnian language is our language, and I do think it would be indifferent of us to give that up … islambosna.

This is part of an answer on islambosna; the whole thread discusses which names are Muslim and which are not, and this comment is about traditional Bosniak names. It is mentioned about 35 times in the Quran. Girls: Aminah, Amyna, Ameeyna two syllables, emphasis on meen. Details: Ameen means someone who is trusted, loyal, or has strong Imaan belief in Allah. Verse is one of about 19 mentions.

Her name is Ahmenah emphasis on Ah , which is mentioned later in this book. And the king said, "Bring him to me; I will appoint him exclusively for myself. Details: Dhahab means gold the precious metal and not the color.

It is mentioned about eight times in the Quran. Dishes and goblets of gold will be passed around them with all that their souls desire and their eyes delight in. Words in Arabic are either masculine or feminine, and this affects their grammatical treatment, but not whether they can be used as names for boys or girls.

The word dahab is only used for girls. Girls: Mohamada, Muhamada, Mohameda four syllabes, emphasis on ham. Details: Muhammad means a person in which praiseworthy characteristics are abundant, or a person who deserves constant praise due to their good traits. Before Islam, only seven people among the Arabs were known to have this name according to Lisan al- Arab.

It is mentioned seven times in the Quran. Muhammad is not but a messenger. So if he was to die or be killed, would you turn back on your heels [to unbelief]? Girls: Jamilah, Jameela, Jamyla two syllables, emphasis on meel. Details: This name means beautiful. While it means both beauty in shape and beauty in behavior, the Quran uses it only to refer to beauty in behavior. It is mentioned six times in the Quran. And they brought upon his shirt false blood. And Allah is the one sought for help against that which you describe.

Girls: Moneerah, Monyra, Munirah, Muneera three syllables, emphasis on neer. Details: The name means enlightening, brilliant, full of light. Verse is the first of six Quranic mentions: Then if they deny you, [O Muhammad] - so were messengers denied before you, who brought clear proofs and written ordinances and the enlightening Scripture. It is mentioned three times in the Quran: It is He who made the sun a shining light and the moon a derived light and determined for it phases - that you may know the number of years and account [of time].

Allah has not created this except in truth. It is the name of the father of Maryam, mother of Isaa Jesus alaihum salam. It is mentioned three times in the Quran, and can only be used for boys.

When the wife of 'Imran said, "My Lord, indeed I have pledged to You what is in my womb, consecrated [for Your service], so accept this from me. Indeed, You are the Hearing, the Knowing. Girls again : Cokaba, Cocaba, Kokaba three syllables, emphasis on Ko.

Details: Kawkab means star. In modern Arabic textbooks the word Kawkab is reserved for planets, while the word najm is used for stars. The modern meaning of planet is more of a retooling of an old word for new purposes not a bad thing necessarily.

A-Z Muslim Baby Girl Names

The word Kawkab is mentioned three times in the Quran. Both versions of the word, Kawkab and Kawkabah, are used for girls only, for cultural reasons. Quranic Mention: So when the night covered him [with darkness], he saw a star.

He said, "This is my lord. Girls: Khalilah, Calila, Khalyla three syllables, emphasis on lee. Details: Khaleel means intimate friend, close acquaintance. It is mentioned three times in the Quran. And who is better in religion than one who submits himself to Allah while being a doer of good and follows the religion of Abraham, inclining toward truth? Note that the emphasis is on Aa thus a long Aa and a quick mina , as opposed to the name Ameenah where the emphasis is on mee.

The name Aamin i. And they say, "If we were to follow the guidance with you, we would be swept from our land.Mail Piety Spotted. The question of whether a part of a social phenomenon is representative of the entire social phenomenon is often difficult to answer in any case; whether anything on the web can be representative of a social phenomenon is perhaps even more difficult to answer, since interaction in writing on the web leaves out many aspects of human interaction.

Muslim woman in Tito's Yugoslavia. Ghazzal Name of a reciter of Quran Nadr Flourishing Obviously most non-Arabs would pronounce both names the same way, but it is good if the person named such knows what the correct pronunciation of their name is. Noble hearted. Need Cultured.

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