EYEON FUSION TUTORIALS PDF

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Tutorials for Eyeon Fusion. Download images and video materials to help you understand the power of this great compositing software. Eyeon Fusion Tutorials. 3D, Photoshop, Flash, Programming and more Tutorials from beginner to advanced | Tutsbuzz. The eyeon Fusion A Tutorial Approach textbook has been written to enable the users to learn the techniques required to create a composition. The textbook.


Eyeon Fusion Tutorials Pdf

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Debugging Tutorial . Managing Fusion Preferences in Larger starts, this environment variable will instruct it to look for preferences in the v\eyeon\fusion\. Eyeon Fusion Tutorials contains free Fusion Tutorials like Fusion Tutorials on Rotoscoping, Color Correction, Green Screen, Particles, Color Keying and more . The eyeon Fusion A Tutorial Approach. eyeon Fusion is one of the world's leading node-based compositing software. It is a powerful.

The tutorial actually starts at about 4. Which is perfect for most editors, who likely to have little or no experience inside Fusion.

Eyeon Fusion Tutorials

Some of these tutorials are performed in version 8 of the software but still very relevant. Subscribe to his channel to keep pace with his uploads. In this tutorial Tony creates a custom motion path from a mask made with a polyline node mask.

In this longer tutorial Tony shows you how to create a pixellated illuminated text animation inside of Fusion. This is another great tutorial to watch if you want to learn a few things about Fusion in the context of actually creating something.

Even more Fusion 8 Tutorials In this older tutorial from Rob Redman you can learn how to do the simplest and most useful of things — making text appear. Jamie Dickinson demonstrates how to use Fusion Connect with DaVinci Resolve, making sure that your grade matches after the round trip. The chap behind Thennika Creations demonstrates how to create an animated logo from scratch in this breakdown tutorial.

The compositor who uses your mattes may wish to turn on motion blur, and when the spline suddenly flies off the edge of the screen, it leaves a streak behind.

You can move it once it's remained still and invisible for a frame or two. We'll return to the topic several times during future lessons.

Download Blackmagic Design Fusion 7 Studio A Tutorial Approach

Keying The second method to create a matte is to use contrasts in the image's color information to generate it automatically. This is known as keying. When a green or bluescreen is used, it is more specifically called chroma-keying. Luma Keyer We'll start with the Luma Keyer. In its default mode, the Luma Key attempts to create the matte by making the brightest parts of the image white and the darkest parts black.

Create a Luma Keyer, connect it to the Loader, and put it in your Viewer. Click the Viewer's Channels button to look at the alpha.

I also toggled the Invert control because we want the actor's matte to be white on black rather than the reverse. Even after I have adjusted the Low and High threshold values to get purer blacks and whites, it is clear that the face and collar will not be part of the matte.

If you look at each of the color channels, though, by selecting the Viewer and hitting the R, G, and B keys, you can see that the green channel has a great deal of contrast with everything except that collar. Change the Channel control to Green and adjust the Low and High thresholds again to get a somewhat better result. The collar is still a problem. There are a few other modes we can try, though.

The consequence of shooting on a screen that is such a pure green is that the screen is quite likely the most saturated thing in the image saturation is measured as the difference between the brightest channel and the other two. Since the screen is almost white in the green channel and black in the red and blue, it is highly saturated. We'll hit some color theory eventually, too, where we can go more deeply into that topic.

Switch the tool to Saturation mode and try adjusting the thresholds again. Unfortunately, this is even worse than the green. The doofus who set up this camera me evidently forgot to turn off the internal sharpening filter.

You probably saw the dramatic ringing in the red and green channels.

That bright outline is causing the saturation key to break down. So it looks like the Luma Keyer isn't going to get us where we need to be.

In fact, that sharpening is probably going to stymie even our best efforts. Nevertheless, we'll carry on and see if we can't salvage something from this footage.

Chroma Keyer The next weapon in our arsenal is the Chroma Keyer. This tool is designed specifically to deal with screens of this sort.

Maybe it will give us better results. The Chroma Keyer works by sampling the screen color and setting thresholds on all three color channels plus the luminance simultaneously to try to make just that color transparent.

Sampling the color is done simply by clicking on the green screen in the Viewport. Clicking just one pixel probably won't do much. The Chroma Keyer lets you drag out a selection box around a group of pixels, though, and all of those pixels are considered for the thresholds. You can make several such selections, and each time you do, more colors are added to the transparency. After getting rid of most of the large blocks of green and pushing the Soft Range all the way up, we start to get something that might just be passable.

There is still more work to be done, of course, but the Chroma Keyer has certainly done a much better job than the Luma Keyer did. In the screenshot, you can see that I have spun down the Color Range controls, so we can see all of the thresholds that have been set. Any pixel that falls into all four ranges shown is considered transparent.

The Soft Range control blurs the ends of the thresholds, allowing pixels near the boundaries to become translucent. In order to clean up the green fringe, we'll use a Matte Control tool. Matte Control is a very useful tool for dealing with alpha channels. It can combine them in various ways, blur them, erode and dilate them, change their falloff, and, most importantly for this image, it can despill and defringe.

Make a Matte Control and place it after the Chroma Keyer.

Switch over to the Spill tab to see what options we have for controlling that fringe. The very first thing to do is to switch the Spill Color from Blue to Green.

Obviously, we have a green screen, so our spill is also going to be green. It will be present to some degree in any chroma key shot, but Fusion's Matte Control is a superb means of getting rid of it. The Spill Suppression control determines how strongly the despill operation is applied. The Spill Method is a selection of four humorously-named algorithms, from least-dramatic to most-dramatic.

Well Done is typically the best for green screens, and Burnt can kill even the strongest spill, but it tends to add too much of the complementary color magenta is complementary to green and yellow to blue. The Fringe controls are a simple color corrector that is applied only to pixels that are translucent. The Fringe Size can push it into neighboring pixels both fully opaque and fully transparent if you need to blend the fringe with the rest of the picture.

With a combination of the Spill Suppression and the Fringe controls, I can get rid of the green halo, but that black line is just not going to go away. At least, not with these controls. I put it in front of an actual background just to see how it holds up on something other than the checkerboard.

Surprisingly well, actually. Some of these tutorials are performed in version 8 of the software but still very relevant.

Subscribe to his channel to keep pace with his uploads. In this tutorial Tony creates a custom motion path from a mask made with a polyline node mask.

Fusion Scripting Resources

In this longer tutorial Tony shows you how to create a pixellated illuminated text animation inside of Fusion. This is another great tutorial to watch if you want to learn a few things about Fusion in the context of actually creating something.

Even more Fusion 8 Tutorials In this older tutorial from Rob Redman you can learn how to do the simplest and most useful of things — making text appear. Jamie Dickinson demonstrates how to use Fusion Connect with DaVinci Resolve, making sure that your grade matches after the round trip. The chap behind Thennika Creations demonstrates how to create an animated logo from scratch in this breakdown tutorial.

He also has a useful eight part basic introduction to Fusion 8, including working with audio, rendering and more. In this tutorial from Thinking Penquin you can learn how to create a long shadow effect for your motion graphic titles.Using this you can automate repetitive or complex tasks, customize Fusion behavior, extend functionality and more.

Other things, like merge tools autolinking to an already selected tool, makes quick work of setup, and there are just too many useful little elements of Fusion to mention. Of course the best thing to do is simply to download the free beta and start noodling around. Primatte is another third-party tool that operates on an entirely different principle than the Chroma and Ultra Keyers.

The PreMatte Range works exactly like the Chroma Keyer, except that if you are looking at UltraKeyer's output while you select colors, you're going to get a tainted selection. Even Primate runs remarkable better in Fusion. In this image, I have placed keys at frames 1 and

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