CATHY GLASS BOOKS PDF

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Cathy has been a foster carer for over 25 years, during which time she has Cathy Glass Author . cover image of Cathy Glass 3-Book Self-Help Collection. Where Men Win Glory (eBook) Freedom Of Information Act, Ebook Pdf, Free . Book Review: The Saddest Girl in the World by Cathy Glass Book Nooks, Great. Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. Flag for This book is a work of non-fiction based on the recollections of Cathy Glass. The names of people.


Cathy Glass Books Pdf

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Also by Cathy Glass. Damaged. Hidden. Cut . she said: 'Cathy's still on the phone and she'd like to talk find Lucy's record book showing her checks and. Download PDF '.Cathy Glass.' for free at This Site. Normally, Here you can download '.Cathy Glass.' in PDF file format for free without need to spent extra money. Cathy Glass has been a foster carer for twenty-five years, during which time she has looked after over one hundred and fifty children, as well as raising three.

The child I was going to learn about today would most certainly need all those things in abundance, and if I took her on I would have to be prepared to say goodbye to my relatively peaceful, steady routine for a while, until she learned to trust me and settled down, just as Lucy had.

But that was the point of fostering it wasnt easy by any means, but the rewards were so enormous. Besides, I had fostered almost continuously for over twenty years now and wasnt sure I could really remember what life before it had been like. Once the children had left, I went upstairs and quickly changed from my joggers into a pair of smart navy trousers and a jumper, and headed for the Social Services offices.

Id been going there for years now, and the journey there was as familiar as the one to my own house. I also knew the drab grey dcor, fluorescent lighting and air of busy activity and only-just-contained chaos very well indeed.

Shed been waiting for my arrival, and walked up to me with a welcoming smile. Hi, Jill. How are you?

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Oh, fine, thanks. Youre looking well.

Yes life is good at the moment. The children are doing well, completely wrapped up in their lives and in their schools. Time for another challenge, I suppose.

I smiled at her. Wed better get along to this meeting. I think theyre ready for us. Jill led me along the corridor to the meeting room. As we entered the room, it was obvious at once that this was a big case: What did it mean? From what Jill had told me, I could tell that this was not a run-of-the-mill fostering situation not many children get through five carers in four months but then, no child was ever run-of-themill. They were always unique and their troubles distinctly their own.

Removing a child from its parents was never going to be a humdrum, everyday event; it was always traumatic, emotional and difficult. Nevertheless, something told me that this was far more complex than anything Id yet encountered. I felt another stab of apprehension, like I had when Jill first told me about the case the day before, but I was also interested.

What could this child be like, to warrant so much involvement from so many people? Jill and I took the two vacant chairs at the far end, and I felt every eye was on me, assessing my suitability. The chairman was Dave Mumby, the Social Services team leader, and he began the round of introductions. On his left was Sally, the guardian ad litem: The lady next to her introduced herself as Nicola, Jodies home tutor.

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Home tutor? Why isnt the child in school?

I wondered. Next was Gary, Jodies current social worker. He explained that he was about to leave the case, and hand Jodie over to Eileen, who was sitting next to him. I looked at Eileen carefully if I was going to take Jodie, then Eileen and I would have to work closely together. At first glance she was nondescript: So far, so good. I wasnt surprised that I was already witnessing a change of social worker.

It happened all the time it was the nature of the job that people had to move on but it was unfortunate for the children and families involved, who were always having to learn new faces, build trust and forge fresh relationships with endless strangers.

Although I knew it was something that couldnt be altered and was just part of the system, with all its flaws, nonetheless I felt for Jodie. Changing social worker would mean yet more disruption for her, and I wondered how many social workers shed been through already.

Next, Deirdre introduced herself. She was the agency link worker for Jodies current foster carers. Then it was my turn, and the eyes of everyone around the table turned to me. I looked around the table, meeting the various gazes.

Im Cathy Glass, I said, as clearly and confidently as I could. Im a foster carer from Homefinders Fostering Agency.

There wasnt much more I could add at this stage, when I knew so little about what was going on, so I passed on to Jill. After Jill came someone from the accounts department, followed by a member of the local authoritys placement team. As they spoke, I looked over at Gary, Jodies current social worker. He was young, and could only have been in his mid-twenties.

How successful had he been at forging a relationship with Jodie? Perhaps Eileen, as a woman, would fare better at empathizing with the little girl, so the change of social worker might be for the better in this case. I hoped so. Once the introductions were complete, Dave thanked us for coming, and gave a brief outline of what had been happening, or to use the correct terminology: I warmed to Dave immediately.

Cathy Glass

He was gently spoken but forthright, and looked directly at me as he spoke. I made a mental note of the salient points: Jodie had been on the at-risk register since birth, which meant that Social Services had been monitoring the family for eight years. Although there had been suspicions of emotional and physical abuse by Jodies parents, no steps had been taken to remove her or her younger brother Ben and sister Chelsea.

Then, four months ago, Jodie had started a house fire by setting light to her pet dog I shivered at this, struck by the.

Damaged: The Heartbreaking True Story of a Forgotten Child by Cathy Glass

Ben and Chelsea had both been placed with foster carers and were doing well. But Jodie exhibited very challenging behaviour. I heard Dave deliver this euphemism and raised my eyebrows. All foster carers knew what that really stood for. It meant completely out of control. I think it would be useful, said Dave, looking at me, for you to hear from her social worker now.

Garys been on the case for two years. Feel free to ask any questions. Despite his youth, Gary was confident and methodical as he gave me an overview of Jodie and her family. Im afraid that the general picture isnt good, as youd expect. Theres severe disruption inside the family. Jodies mother is an intravenous drug user and her father is an alcoholic. In recent years, Jodies suffered a number of injuries while at home, including burns, scalds, cuts, bruises and a broken finger.

All of these were recorded at hospital, and although it was suspected that some of the injuries were non-accidental, it was impossible to prove that this was the case. Gary went on with his tale of neglect and misery while I concentrated on absorbing the facts.

It was an appalling case history but Id heard similar stories many times before. Nevertheless, it never ceased to amaze and horrify me that people could treat their children with such cruelty and indifference, and I was already feeling for this poor little girl.

How could any child grow and be. Gary continued, Jodies no longer in school because of the recent moves, which is why shes been assigned a home tutor. She has learning difficulties and a statement of special needs. That was straightforward enough I was used to looking after children with developmental delays and learning difficulties.

I suspected that Gary was giving me the censored version of Jodies case history. In all my years of fostering, Id never heard of a child going through five carers in four months. When he paused and looked at me, I seized my opportunity. It would be helpful if you could tell me the make-up of the families of the previous carers, I said, hoping to discover clues to explain why Jodie had gone through so many, so fast. How many children did they have, and were they older or younger?

Had the carers had experience with this type of child before? Gary coughed and looked a little shifty. The previous placement breakdowns were purely circumstantial, he said. Shelves: reviewed , fiction , novels , abuse , realistic-fiction This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. It bothers me that people here on Goodreads seem to think that this is nonfiction! Did you even read the book?!

Sorry but these things get to me sometimes! That being said, I was thoroughly delighted with the way Cathy wrote this story. It seemed so different than the way she writes her non-fiction memoirs.

I really think she should branch out and do more fiction sometime, because it was a nice change o It bothers me that people here on Goodreads seem to think that this is nonfiction! I really think she should branch out and do more fiction sometime, because it was a nice change of pace.

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Can I Let You Go? Faye is 24, pregnant, and has learning difficulties as a result of her mother's alcoholism. Faye is gentle, childlike and vulnerable, and normally lives with her grandparents, both of whom have mobility problems.

Cathy and her children welcome Faye into their home and hearts. The care plan is for Faye to stay with Cathy until after the birth when she will return home and the baby will go for adoption.

Given that Faye never goes out alone it is something of a mystery how she ever became pregnant and Faye says it's a secret. To begin with Faye won't acknowledge she is pregnant or talk about the changes in her body as she worries it will upset her grandparents, but after her social worker assures her she can talk to Cathy she opens up.

However, this leads to Faye realizing just how much she will lose and she changes her mind and says she wants to keep her baby. Is it possible Faye could learn enough to parent her child? Cathy believes it is, and Faye's social worker is obliged to give Faye the chance. The heartbreaking true story of a young, troubled mother who needed help. It is the first time Laura has been out since the birth of her baby when Cathy sees her in the school playground.

A joyful occasion but Cathy has the feeling something is wrong. By the time she discovers what it is, it is too late. This is the true story of Laura whose life touches Cathy's in a way she could never have foreseen. It is also the true stories of little Darrel, Samson and Hayley who she fosters when their parents need help. Some stories can have a happy ending and others cannot, but as a foster carer Cathy can only do her best.

The sixteenth fostering memoir by Cathy Glass. Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free. An Unsuitable Woman Kat Gordon. Underland Robert Macfarlane. Home Authors Cathy Glass. Cathy Glass - Author.

Featured books by Cathy Glass

About the Author Cathy Glass has been a foster carer for twenty-five years, during which time she has looked after over one hundred and fifty children, as well as raising three children of her own. A Long Way from Home Author: Cruel to Be Kind Author: Nobody's Son Author: Angry and Hurting, She's Out of Control. The Child Bride Author: Daddy's Little Princess Author: Run, Mummy, Run Author: Nobody's Son: All Alex ever wanted was a family of his own Author: Part 3 of 3: Part 2 of 3: Part 1 of 3: Run, Mommy, Run Author: Can I Let You Go?: A heartbreaking true story of love, loss and moving on Author: Silent Cry Author: Silent Cry: There is little Kim can do as her mother's mental health spirals out of control Author:Cathy writes with clarity, and compassion, setting her thoughts on paper, yet she doesn't judge.

The child I was going to learn about today would most certainly need all those things in abundance, and if I took her on I would have to be prepared to say goodbye to my relatively peaceful, steady routine for a while, until she learned to trust me and settled down, just as Lucy had. When it comes to dresses being paraded with presidential semen stains still upon them, or the latest youtube viral video horrors, you may think so.

Jodie had been on the at-risk register since birth, which meant that Social Services had been monitoring the family for eight years. Cathy Glass. From what Jill had told me, I could tell that this was not a run-of-the-mill fostering situation not many children get through five carers in four months but then, no child was ever run-of-themill. Surely, I thought, someone could say something nice about her, even if it was only that she liked her food.

Proceedings to decide Jodies future were now beginning; if the court judged that she was better off at home, and all the fears for her safety there were put to rest, then she would be returned to her parents care. Micael Fazz. Cathy writes simply, yet with such passion, and while she never judges, her views and thoughts are plain to see.

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