TEMPO VENKATESH RAO PDF

adminComment(0)

Tempo: timing, tactics and strategy in narrative-driven decision-making - site edition by Venkatesh Rao. Download it once and read it on your site device. Venkatesh Rao's Tempo is one such treasure: ignore this book at your own peril. You could make a horror movie about the PDF format alone. Tempo is worth reading if you know how to take abstractions and apply them. Or if you simply like Has Venkatesh Rao truly lived? 2, Views · Is Quora User.


Tempo Venkatesh Rao Pdf

Author:RUBEN BACHLEDA
Language:English, Indonesian, French
Country:Liechtenstein
Genre:Children & Youth
Pages:352
Published (Last):15.02.2016
ISBN:229-9-70495-225-4
ePub File Size:20.83 MB
PDF File Size:16.15 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:50034
Uploaded by: BRIANA

Tempo: timing, tactics and strategy in narrative-driven decision-making Author: Venkatesh Guru Rao Logica e Tempo: Che tempo è il Nostro Tempo?. by. Venkatesh G. Rao. · Rating details · ratings · 27 reviews. Tempo is a modern treatment of decision-making that weaves together concepts and. timing, tactics and strategy in narrative-driven decision-making.

Please check out the book site and download the regular edition, available from site. Thanks to the over people who bought the Stealth Edition and get the buzz going. Two and a half years after I began scribbling my first notes, my first book Tempo is finally sneaking out into the marketplace.

Today, I am releasing an early stealth edition. It is exactly the same as the regular edition to come in about 6 weeks, except that this edition has a a nice early release discount and b an extra page at the end with details of a little experiment designed to get some word-of-mouth going.

If you choose to participate in the experiment, you can get the ebook free later the experiment involves giving your copy away. The regular edition without the word-of-mouth experiment should be out on site. This Stealth Edition will be discontinued at that time. I already released this last Friday on the Be Slightly Evil mailing list, and sold just over a hundred copies on the opening weekend.

Other formats will follow. I am trying to get the cheapest possible distribution lined up. A quick request: if you plan on reviewing the book, please hold off till May I am taking this one slow and easy. Note: if you were one of the early downloaders, and your version has a misprinted page 12, download the corrected page here. My sincere apologies if you received the flawed copy.

So much for the basics. Davison Avery from Toronto has been reading the site from the beginning. I think of him as a bit of a Godfather to this blog in both Mafia and regular senses of the word.

What I liked a lot was the ideas on how to diagram a conversation. But overall not a lot of content. More of a "common sense" tome mixed in with a plethora of academic quotes. Very high level and not a book that I think will help anyone learn how I was very hopeful about this book.

Very high level and not a book that I think will help anyone learn how to deal with situations they have not before.

It made me to want to learn about the many folks the author references. It also made me want to put the book down several times.

Rao's style is to take you through dozens of models for every idea, but when he does give examples they illustrate wonderfully. I'll be digesting this for a while. Nov 24, Maxwell Foley rated it it was ok This was a very strange book.

I read it because I have seen a lot of interesting-looking content emerging from the scene around this guy's blog, ribbonfarm. Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews.

Crash Early, Crash Often

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Tempo , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Tempo is a library in a book. Concepts are covered in 3 pages that deserve 30, and many are outsourced to the admirable bibliography for fuller treatment.

Tempo is best approached as a map - intentionally bringing to the fore enough information to provide directionality and context while leaving the specifics to be encountered or sought. It's a dense book, as a result - high information, in the Shannon sense, but maintaining consilience. The ma Tempo is a library in a book. The main idea is presented nearly three fourths of the way through the book, and a couple key definitions appear later still, as much of the lead-up is preparatory, appropriately priming the reader conceptually.

This is a book to be read once quickly, in an afternoon or a weekend, and then again over weeks or months, ideally with someone willing to share the experience and wrestle with the concepts alongside. Nov 14, Suhrob rated it it was ok. I'm a big fan of Venkat's writing at ribbonfarm. However, often I feel reading him is a guilty pleasure. Venkat is a good writer, and even better reader. He connects many distant concepts into broader frameworks.

Why guilty pleasure then? Well I think, these frameworks very, very rarely do any actual work - the new viewpoints, do not yield any practical benefits, insight or understanding. They reparametrize usually simple, often overlooked, concepts with much more complex constructions.

While the I'm a big fan of Venkat's writing at ribbonfarm. While the new formalisms are very impressive, they rarely bring anything actually actionable. And you know, that is completely fine and highly enjoyable.

But in a book format it was much harder to stomach. Venkat takes one overlooked aspect of decision making, the tempo, and spins around it an extended conceptual framework that includes extending the standard narrative triangle to a double Freytag triangle and then linking it to a 'staircase' including reparametrization from wall-clock time to entropy.

Differential geometry is name-dropped on the way, for good measure.

This is not Deepak Chopra hullabaloo. Venkat understands the concepts, uses them coherently and the metaphorical link is there.

You read about pages of theory without having a clue, with no reason or motivation stated at all. Sure, it's a nice observation that there is something like a tempo in decision making. But is this book help you to make better decisions? Or what? A huge, huge failure here is doing a lot of work without any statement of motivation. Eventually one can see that being more sensitive to the tempo might be beneficial, but there is not much practical advice here tempo doodling?

This document failed to load

The narrative focus is very dangerous. I think his method of embracing the narratives can bring some benefits, but is much, much more vulnerable to the slew of biases.

The net benefit is questionable, and never discussed in the book. I was very hopeful about this book. It came from a friend. Also the first two chapters are very gripping. The writing style and the deep narrative tone raised my expectations.

What are LessWrong's thoughts on Venkatesh Rao, Gregory Rader, and Daniel Lemire?

What I liked a lot was the ideas on how to diagram a conversation. But overall not a lot of content. More of a "common sense" tome mixed in with a plethora of academic quotes. Very high level and not a book that I think will help anyone learn how I was very hopeful about this book.

Very high level and not a book that I think will help anyone learn how to deal with situations they have not before.

Transcript

It made me to want to learn about the many folks the author references. It also made me want to put the book down several times. Mar 17, Vikrant Varma rated it liked it.

Packed with insights but hard to comprehend. Rao's style is to take you through dozens of models for every idea, but when he does give examples they illustrate wonderfully. I'll be digesting this for a while. Nov 24, Maxwell Foley rated it it was ok. This was a very strange book. I read it because I have seen a lot of interesting-looking content emerging from the scene around this guy's blog, ribbonfarm. However I have never known where to begin when it comes to reading him.

After reading this book, I am more confused than ever. The book essentially reads as if a middle-aged consultant took LSD and went to a board meeting. Suddenly, the inner workings of the office is revealed to him as an elegant dance of information. The Q3 financial r This was a very strange book.

The Q3 financial report PowerPoint projected in the front of the room comes alive as a lattice of interconnected channels of possibilities stretching deeply into the past and extending infinitely into the future. The room inhales and exhales, and a series of energy flows emanate from each human being in the room, transmitting information about their hypothetical future productivity into the author's third eye. Filled with a euphoric energy, the author scribbles down notes about the nature of time, space, consciousness and how it all interacts with the synergistic possibilities for collaboration in the modern workplace.

Diagrams, charts, and graphs all emerge from the author's pen, as if channelling some unknown force. The author has uncovered some truly deeper wisdom, and he knows he will never see the mundane office the same way again, for he has uncovered the secrets to eternal maximization of productivity. Anyway, I guess all you can say about this book is that it's like viewing the inner workings of an extremely intelligent, analytical, and creative person's mind.

I'm glad something like this exists in the world, but it doesn't really seem like it conveys much that will stick with me, or anyone. A lot of very complex concepts are introduced but I'm not sure if any meaning is ever transmitted. Venkatesh Rao's book is a brilliant read that incorporates learning theory, real-time assessment of uncertainty, and most importantly conceptual models that allow one to see and understand their surroundings faster and perceptively randomly than others.

While Rao does struggle with being too prescriptive an approach akin to a self-help cookbook , he successfully strains to point out to the reader that learning and conceptual recognition and the tempo by which that is accomplished is not poss Venkatesh Rao's book is a brilliant read that incorporates learning theory, real-time assessment of uncertainty, and most importantly conceptual models that allow one to see and understand their surroundings faster and perceptively randomly than others.

While Rao does struggle with being too prescriptive an approach akin to a self-help cookbook , he successfully strains to point out to the reader that learning and conceptual recognition and the tempo by which that is accomplished is not possible by rote recognition and tool application.

Rao's concepts of perception being emotionally based rather than cognitive, the "cheap-trick," and the Double-Freitag are quite descriptive models for fruitful thinking in the terms that "all models are wrong, but some are useful". As a prescriptive tome the book is not very useful, but if you are seeking a self-help silver bullet your search will go on endlessly.

The value in Rao's concepts, the ultimate value of this text, is the mental provocations that it makes in the mind of the reader. Highly recommend. View 1 comment. Feb 21, Chris rated it it was amazing Shelves: Fun read and some cool mental concepts to play around with. Rao notes 'narrative rationality' is a powerful and dangerous approach to decision making.

Thinking in terms of stories leads to all sorts of biases.Preview — Tempo by Venkatesh G. Separation event - Crescendo - Mental model externalised into environment. I think of him as a bit of a Godfather to this blog in both Mafia and regular senses of the word. A lot of very complex concepts are introduced but I'm not sure if any meaning is ever transmitted.

Ensure you have some light fiction running in parallel to this book to keep company, might make the journey a little bit easier. Note: if you were one of the early downloaders, and your version has a misprinted page 12, download the corrected page here. The intro cites everything from cooking to control theory to military tactics, promising to tie it all together.

SHARICE from Daytona Beach
I do relish reading books solidly. Look over my other posts. I enjoy bumper pool.
>